GROWING UP MUSLIM

UNDERSTANDING ISLAMIC BELIEFS AND PRACTICES

Readers will find answers to basic questions about Muslims, yet they might not understand the bigger picture if they don’t...

Ali-Karamali offers plenty of anecdotes about growing up Muslim in America in a conversational tone that is undermined by poor organization.

The work explores a range of questions that non-Muslims might have about followers of Islam. Ranging from a discussion of Muslim holidays or the kinds of clothes worn by Muslims to the development of Islam, the author explains these topics in a friendly, engaging manner. She provides several examples of Muslim practices around the world, going beyond her American experiences to reflect Islam’s diversity. Chapters are organized into three fact-filled sections on beliefs and practices, the development of Islam and current Muslim demographics. Unfortunately, beginning with the practical questions about food, fasting and fashion delays important concepts such as how jihad is not equivalent to terrorism and whether Islam mandates women wear face veils (in a word, no). Compounding this basic conceptual flaw, this organizational choice necessitates clunky references to later chapters. Moreover, it is not until Chapter 4 that cited figures or quotes are provided references, an example of sloppy scholarship.

Readers will find answers to basic questions about Muslims, yet they might not understand the bigger picture if they don’t hang in until the end. (notes, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 12-16)

Pub Date: Aug. 14, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-385-74095-1

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Delacorte

Review Posted Online: June 19, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2012

SCANDALOUS!

50 SHOCKING EVENTS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT (SO YOU CAN IMPRESS YOUR FRIENDS)

Catnip for scandal junkies, with a bit of historical perspective stirred in.

A gleefully explicit catalogue of the past century’s headline-grabbing bad behavior.

Aimed at readers who don’t need to be told who Brangelina is but may be hazy on “twisted besties” Leopold and Loeb or even Monica Lewinsky, this edutaining survey presents a wide-angle array of murders, sexual follies, controversial trials, race violence, political corruption and general envelope-pushing from the 1906 killing of Stanford White on. Each of the chronologically arranged entries opens with a capsule “Scoop” followed by a slightly fuller account under a “What Went Down” header. Along with a small black-and-white photo and one or two sidebar quotes, the author tacks on subsequent developments, sometimes-perceptive suggestions about “Why We Still Care” and a short roster of similar incidents in recent history. Though she misspells “Symbionese” and repeatedly awards FDR only three Presidential wins, in general Fryd presents reasonably accurate summaries of events and issues while giving all sides of the more muddled conflicts at least a nod. Additional cred is provided by a teen panel of editorial advisors.

Catnip for scandal junkies, with a bit of historical perspective stirred in. (index) (Nonfiction. 12-16)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-9827322-0-5

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Zest/Orange Avenue

Review Posted Online: Jan. 8, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2012

THE BOOK OF STYLING

AN INSIDER'S GUIDE TO CREATING YOUR OWN LOOK

For a guide to fashion, there's not much flair here. But there's plenty of valuable info for budding fashionistas and...

A matter-of-fact tone removes the mystery from style in this work that is one-part fashion manual and one-part career guide.

Flaherty begins by explaining what a stylist is and the tools he or she uses. She moves on to a wide range of different looks like Socialite, Tomboy and Hipster; fashion elements like color and prints; and a thorough understanding of body type. While the number of fashion personalities is impressive, not one is male, a confusing omission given that boys wear clothes, too. The section on body types is very useful with its real-world examples, Naomi Campbell representing the Inverted Triangle type. The second half is more practical, focusing on "curating" a closet, building a wardrobe, styling oneself and others, and styling as a career. Sprinkled throughout the text are activities like a fashion-movie night and organizing a clothing swap. The illustrations are attractive, yet it's too bad there isn't a greater variety of body types represented.

For a guide to fashion, there's not much flair here. But there's plenty of valuable info for budding fashionistas and stylists, going beyond the shallow glitz of fashion magazines and blogs. (index) (Nonfiction. 12-16)

Pub Date: Sept. 26, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-9827322-4-3

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Zest Books

Review Posted Online: July 24, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2012

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