SEASONS BETWEEN US

TALES OF IDENTITIES AND MEMORIES

From the Laska Anthology series

Fans of speculative fiction are well served.

Stories of how life events, some cyclical, shape identities through time are featured in the latest anthology in the thematically focused speculative-fiction series.

Through soft and hard science fiction, magical realism, folklore, horror, high fantasy, and alternate history, the 20 stories and two poems tackle aging, loss, change, and adaptation. Like the authors and characters, the settings are diverse: Japan, Singapore, India, Tanzania, Wales, Canada, and the U.S. Most stories portray the middle-aged or elderly in conflict with young adults or simply themselves at an earlier age. In C.J. Cheung’s spare, evocative “Clear Waters,” an elderly man, shaped by loss, feels betrayed when his daughter partners with an android. In Alvaro Zinos-Amaro’s ironic “Sympathétique,” a young man uses his future self to smooth his path and shape his life. A desperate father places his family’s survival in the hands of his teen children in Tyler Keevil’s apocalyptic “Summer of Our Discontent.” In Maria Haskins’ haunting “When Resin Burns to Tar,” a woman struggles to free herself from her dominating, deceased mother. Despite the quality of the writing, this anthology’s guiding motif is too amorphous and general for overall thematic cohesion. While authors’ “notes to my younger self” follow each story, offering various tidbits of life advice, few of the stories center on young adults’ concerns.

Fans of speculative fiction are well served. (mental health and anti-discrimination resources) (Speculative fiction anthology. 16-adult)

Pub Date: Aug. 8, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-988140-16-2

Page Count: 362

Publisher: Laksa Media

Review Posted Online: June 1, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2021

Awards & Accolades

Likes

  • Readers Vote
  • 126


Our Verdict

  • Our Verdict
  • GET IT


  • New York Times Bestseller

DEVOLUTION

A tasty, if not always tasteful, tale of supernatural mayhem that fans of King and Crichton alike will enjoy.

Awards & Accolades

Likes

  • Readers Vote
  • 126


Our Verdict

  • Our Verdict
  • GET IT


  • New York Times Bestseller

Are we not men? We are—well, ask Bigfoot, as Brooks does in this delightful yarn, following on his bestseller World War Z (2006).

A zombie apocalypse is one thing. A volcanic eruption is quite another, for, as the journalist who does a framing voice-over narration for Brooks’ latest puts it, when Mount Rainier popped its cork, “it was the psychological aspect, the hyperbole-fueled hysteria that had ended up killing the most people.” Maybe, but the sasquatches whom the volcano displaced contributed to the statistics, too, if only out of self-defense. Brooks places the epicenter of the Bigfoot war in a high-tech hideaway populated by the kind of people you might find in a Jurassic Park franchise: the schmo who doesn’t know how to do much of anything but tries anyway, the well-intentioned bleeding heart, the know-it-all intellectual who turns out to know the wrong things, the immigrant with a tough backstory and an instinct for survival. Indeed, the novel does double duty as a survival manual, packed full of good advice—for instance, try not to get wounded, for “injury turns you from a giver to a taker. Taking up our resources, our time to care for you.” Brooks presents a case for making room for Bigfoot in the world while peppering his narrative with timely social criticism about bad behavior on the human side of the conflict: The explosion of Rainier might have been better forecast had the president not slashed the budget of the U.S. Geological Survey, leading to “immediate suspension of the National Volcano Early Warning System,” and there’s always someone around looking to monetize the natural disaster and the sasquatch-y onslaught that follows. Brooks is a pro at building suspense even if it plays out in some rather spectacularly yucky episodes, one involving a short spear that takes its name from “the sucking sound of pulling it out of the dead man’s heart and lungs.” Grossness aside, it puts you right there on the scene.

A tasty, if not always tasteful, tale of supernatural mayhem that fans of King and Crichton alike will enjoy.

Pub Date: June 16, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9848-2678-7

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Del Rey/Ballantine

Review Posted Online: Feb. 9, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

POWERLESS

From the Powerless Trilogy series , Vol. 1

A lackluster and sometimes disturbing mishmash of overused tropes.

The Plague has left a population divided between Elites and Ordinaries—those who have powers and those who don’t; now, an Ordinary teen fights for her life.

Paedyn Gray witnessed the king kill her father five years ago, and she’s been thieving and sleeping rough ever since, all while faking Psychic abilities. When she inadvertently saves the life of Prince Kai, she becomes embroiled in the Purging Trials, a competition to commemorate the sickness that killed most of the kingdom’s Ordinaries. Kai’s duties as the future Enforcer include eradicating any remaining Ordinaries, and these Trials are his chance to prove that he’s internalized his brutal training. But Kai can’t help but find Pae’s blue eyes, silver hair, and unabashed attitude enchanting. She likewise struggles to resist his stormy gray eyes, dark hair, and rakish behavior, even as they’re pitted against each other in the Trials and by the king himself. Scenes and concepts that are strongly reminiscent of the Hunger Games fall flat: They aren’t bolstered by the original’s heart or worldbuilding logic that would have justified a few extreme story elements. Illogical leaps and inconsistent characterizations abound, with lighthearted romantic interludes juxtaposed against genocide, child abuse, and sadism. These elements, which are not sufficiently addressed, combined with the use of ableist language, cannot be erased by any amount of romantic banter. Main characters are cued white; the supporting cast has some brown-skinned characters.

A lackluster and sometimes disturbing mishmash of overused tropes. (map) (Fantasy. 14-18)

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 2023

ISBN: 9798987380406

Page Count: 538

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: Sept. 9, 2023

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2023

Close Quickview