THE FROG PRINCE

Another dazzler from Schenker though, like many of the Hausmärchen, a patchwork affair that plotwise doesn’t come close to...

The very first tale in the Brothers Grimm’s classic collection gets a lavish makeover.

Definitely not an exponent of inconspicuous book design, Schenker places finely rendered cut-paper figures with gold and silver highlights on sheets of clear acetate or plain expanses of creamy white and rich green paper for illustrations. The sheets are bound with exposed cords between plain black boards fronted by a die-cut title in an antique type, and the text—printed in several sizes, with gold initials and occasionally in green or gold ink—is a shortened and lightly burnished rendition of the 1857 and final version in an uncredited modern translation. Readers familiar with the sanitized versions and not so conscious of class expectations as formerly may well wonder what the prince, who is neither kissed nor allowed onto the royal bed but thrown against the wall, sees in the pouty, spoiled princess. It’s a question all right…but suddenly there he is, not only a hunk with “beautiful, friendly eyes,” but without further ado “her dear companion and husband.” Of the all-white cast only the prince’s servant Heinrich, the iron (gold, in the pictures) bands around his heart broken in joy, can likely look forward to a happy future.

Another dazzler from Schenker though, like many of the Hausmärchen, a patchwork affair that plotwise doesn’t come close to hanging together. (Picture book/fairy tale. 6-9)

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 2018

ISBN: 978-988-8341-47-4

Page Count: 48

Publisher: minedition

Review Posted Online: Oct. 14, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2018

PROFESSOR ASTRO CAT'S SPACE ROCKETS

From the Professor Astro Cat series

Energetic enough to carry younger rocketeers off the launch pad if not into a very high orbit.

The bubble-helmeted feline explains what rockets do and the role they have played in sending people (and animals) into space.

Addressing a somewhat younger audience than in previous outings (Professor Astro Cat’s Frontiers of Space, 2013, etc.), Astro Cat dispenses with all but a light shower of “factoroids” to describe how rockets work. A highly selective “History of Space Travel” follows—beginning with a crew of fruit flies sent aloft in 1947, later the dog Laika (her dismal fate left unmentioned), and the human Yuri Gagarin. Then it’s on to Apollo 11 in 1969; the space shuttles Discovery, Columbia, and Challenger (the fates of the latter two likewise elided); the promise of NASA’s next-gen Orion and the Space Launch System; and finally vague closing references to other rockets in the works for local tourism and, eventually, interstellar travel. In the illustrations the spacesuited professor, joined by a mouse and cat in similar dress, do little except float in space and point at things. Still, the art has a stylish retro look, and portraits of Sally Ride and Guion Bluford diversify an otherwise all-white, all-male astronaut corps posing heroically or riding blocky, geometric spacecraft across starry reaches.

Energetic enough to carry younger rocketeers off the launch pad if not into a very high orbit. (glossary) (Informational picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 4, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-911171-55-3

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Flying Eye Books

Review Posted Online: July 15, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2018

INCREDIBLE JOBS YOU'VE (PROBABLY) NEVER HEARD OF

Chicken sexer? Breath odor evaluator? Cryptozoologist? Island caretaker? The choices dazzle! (Informational picture book....

From funeral clown to cheese sculptor, a tally of atypical trades.

This free-wheeling survey, framed as a visit to “The Great Hall of Jobs,” is designed to shake readers loose from simplistic notions of the world of work. Labarre opens with a generic sculpture gallery of, as she puts it, “The Classics”—doctor, dancer, farmer, athlete, chef, and the like—but quickly moves on, arranging busy cartoon figures by the dozen in kaleidoscopic arrays, with pithy captions describing each occupation. As changes of pace she also tucks in occasional challenges to match select workers (Las Vegas wedding minister, “ethical” hacker, motion-capture actor) with their distinctive tools or outfits. The actual chances of becoming, say, the queen’s warden of the swans or a professional mattress jumper, not to mention the nitty-gritty of physical or academic qualifications, income levels, and career paths, are left largely unspecified…but along with noting that new jobs are being invented all the time (as, in the illustration, museum workers wheel in a “vlogger” statue), the author closes with the perennial insight that it’s essential to love what you do and the millennial one that there’s nothing wrong with repeatedly switching horses midstream. The many adult figures and the gaggle of children (one in a wheelchair) visiting the “Hall” are diverse of feature, sex, and skin color.

Chicken sexer? Breath odor evaluator? Cryptozoologist? Island caretaker? The choices dazzle! (Informational picture book. 7-9)

Pub Date: April 14, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-5362-1219-8

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Nosy Crow

Review Posted Online: Nov. 23, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2019

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