A surprisingly incisive rendering of a shattered society—or, just another world gone wrong.

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ENDLAND

Thirty-eight surrealistic short fictions about gods and monsters and other neighbors cohabitating at the end of the world.

This collection by British multimedia artist and writer Etchells (Vacuum Days, 2012, etc.) may be about, as the author notes on the first page, “Kings, lords, liars, goal-hangers, killers, psychics and prostitutes,” but it’s also a politically charged and graphic portrait of Western societies hanging on by a thread. With an introduction by Britpop legend Jarvis Cocker, who shares Etchells’ roots in Thatcher-era England, this particular work of art demonstrates once more that what goes around comes around. This loosely connected compilation of stories set in the shared universe of “Endland” finds characters both conventional and macabre mingling in a place where adversity is constant and happiness, elusive. The first half resurrects 1990s-era pieces from the long out-of-print Endland Stories (1999). The opener, “About Lisa,” concerns a young woman who works in a topless chip shop and whose life is changed by a murder. “Who Would Dream That Truth Was Lies?” introduces one of the book’s recurring conceits, a pantheon of gods that includes traditional Greek gods but also outliers like Herpes, Chandelier, and Rent Boy, among others, a conceit that continues in “Arse on Earth.” It’s easy to go too far, as in “Chaikin/Twins,” a nature-nurture experiment that finds a man contrasting twin sisters, one pampered and one sexually brutalized. There are nontraditional morality tales about a fallen starlet, a transient pop star, and a woman disintegrating into the ether of cyberspace. Stories in the collection’s back half are less graphic but turn a black mirror to the movies, from crime stories set in Endland to a horror fiction based on found footage to an unexpected take on “scripted reality.” They aren’t easy to digest, these lurid tales of poverty, parricide, ghosts, and untimely deaths, but they do pose some hard questions about the world outside our windows.

A surprisingly incisive rendering of a shattered society—or, just another world gone wrong.

Pub Date: May 12, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-911508-70-0

Page Count: 352

Publisher: And Other Stories

Review Posted Online: Feb. 10, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

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Charming, challenging, and so interesting you can hardly put it down.

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SUCH A FUN AGE

The relationship between a privileged white mom and her black babysitter is strained by race-related complications.

Blogger/role model/inspirational speaker Alix Chamberlain is none too happy about moving from Manhattan to Philadelphia for her husband Peter's job as a TV newscaster. With no friends or in-laws around to help out with her almost-3-year-old, Briar, and infant, Catherine, she’ll never get anywhere on the book she’s writing unless she hires a sitter. She strikes gold when she finds Emira Tucker. Twenty-five-year-old Emira’s family and friends expect her to get going on a career, but outside the fact that she’s about to get kicked off her parents’ health insurance, she’s happy with her part-time gigs—and Briar is her "favorite little human." Then one day a double-header of racist events topples the apple cart—Emira is stopped by a security guard who thinks she's kidnapped Briar, and when Peter's program shows a segment on the unusual ways teenagers ask their dates to the prom, he blurts out "Let's hope that last one asked her father first" about a black boy hoping to go with a white girl. Alix’s combination of awkwardness and obsession with regard to Emira spins out of control and then is complicated by the reappearance of someone from her past (coincidence alert), where lies yet another racist event. Reid’s debut sparkles with sharp observations and perfect details—food, décor, clothes, social media, etc.—and she’s a dialogue genius, effortlessly incorporating toddler-ese, witty boyfriend–speak, and African American Vernacular English. For about two-thirds of the book, her evenhandedness with her varied cast of characters is impressive, but there’s a point at which any possible empathy for Alix disappears. Not only is she shallow, entitled, unknowingly racist, and a bad mother, but she has not progressed one millimeter since high school, and even then she was worse than we thought. Maybe this was intentional, but it does make things—ha ha—very black and white.

Charming, challenging, and so interesting you can hardly put it down.

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-525-54190-5

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: Oct. 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 2019

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Well-written and insightful but so heartbreaking that it raises the question of what a reader is looking for in fiction.

DEAR EDWARD

A 12-year-old boy is the sole survivor of a plane crash—a study in before and after.

Edward Adler is moving to California with his adored older brother, Jordan, and their parents: Mom is a scriptwriter for television, Dad is a mathematician who is home schooling his sons. They will get no further than Colorado, where the plane goes down. Napolitano’s (A Good Hard Look, 2011, etc.) novel twins the narrative of the flight from takeoff to impact with the story of Edward’s life over the next six years. Taken in by his mother’s sister and her husband, a childless couple in New Jersey, Edward’s misery is constant and almost impermeable. Unable to bear sleeping in the never-used nursery his aunt and uncle have hastily appointed to serve as his bedroom, he ends up bunking next door, where there's a kid his age, a girl named Shay. This friendship becomes the single strand connecting him to the world of the living. Meanwhile, in alternating chapters, we meet all the doomed airplane passengers, explore their backstories, and learn about their hopes and plans, every single one of which is minutes from obliteration. For some readers, Napolitano’s premise will be too dark to bear, underlining our terrible vulnerability to random events and our inability to protect ourselves or our children from the worst-case scenario while also imagining in exhaustive detail the bleak experience of survival. The people around Edward have no idea how to deal with him; his aunt and uncle try their best to protect him from the horrors of his instant celebrity as Miracle Boy. As one might expect, there is a ray of light for Edward at the end of the tunnel, and for hardier readers this will make Napolitano’s novel a story of hope.

Well-written and insightful but so heartbreaking that it raises the question of what a reader is looking for in fiction.

Pub Date: Jan. 14, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9848-5478-0

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Dial

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2019

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