Goofy, readable chapter-book fun for our Chihuahua butler.

GIVE CHEESE A CHANCE

From the DJ Funkyfoot series , Vol. 2

DJ Funkyfoot puts his foot down.

DJ Funkyfoot is not a hip-hop star or a rapper; he is a Chihuahua butler. His parents gave him the first name DJ (in case he decided to spin funky beats) and middle name MC (in case he excelled at rapping cool rhymes), but all DJ Funkyfoot wants is a great butler job. It’s a fantastic and amazing day—worthy of shouting “WOW!”—when he gets a call from the White House butler. The president’s own butler, a mustachioed pig in a beret, is taking a vacation day to go play miniature golf. DJ Funkyfoot has a new job for the day! But President Horse G. Horse is quite a pawful. All that’s on the docket today is to sign the peace treaty with Wingland, but the president is too much of a selfish baby to cooperate. Funny dialogue and frequent cartoon illustrations keep the action lively as President Horse drags DJ Funkyfoot into all kinds of silly trouble at the Mini Golf and Fondue Fun Spot. DJ Funkyfoot knows how to be a good butler, but if a butler works for someone who lies and cheats and doesn’t care about war, he can’t always say “yes” to everything. Witty repetitive prose aids comprehension (and the recurrences of “hot cheese volcano” make mini golf sound extra delicious).

Goofy, readable chapter-book fun for our Chihuahua butler. (Humor. 6-9)

Pub Date: Sept. 7, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-4197-4730-4

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Amulet/Abrams

Review Posted Online: Aug. 11, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2021

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A hilarious but enlightening guide to the online world—the good, the bad, and the ugly.

BAD KITTY GETS A PHONE (GRAPHIC NOVEL)

A craving for the latest tech leads to cat-astrophe in this new addition to the Bad Kitty series.

With her heart set on owning a cellphone, anthropomorphic house cat Kitty plows through three solid months of chores without complaining before her owners reluctantly grant her fervent wish. Then things go rapidly downhill. She becomes obsessed with violent mobile games, gets catfished (no pun intended), divulges too much personal information online, becomes consumed with rage at cyberbullies, and grows listless from excessive screen time. Only after the intervention of a Sphynx cat named Strange Kitty and a monthlong technology fast enforced by her owners does Kitty come to understand that while smartphones are fun, they can also be a serious distraction from real life and true friends. Using a digestible graphic-novel format, the book tackles internet safety and digital media literacy with purr-fect aplomb. The “Uncle Murray’s Fun Facts” section serves as a deep dive into the differences between facts and opinions, and many of Kitty’s quirky feline behaviors ring true. It’s unfortunate that the word lame—a disability-related term with negative connotations—is used by the internet trolls who deride the video Kitty makes and posts on “ViewTube.” Occasional misstep aside, Kitty’s tribulations provide ample fodder for this instructive and amusing tale.

A hilarious but enlightening guide to the online world—the good, the bad, and the ugly. (Graphic novel. 6-9)

Pub Date: Dec. 28, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-250-74996-3

Page Count: 144

Publisher: Roaring Brook Press

Review Posted Online: Nov. 16, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2021

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Readers who (inexplicably) find David Lawrence’s Pickle and Penguin (2004) just too weird may settle in more comfortably...

LOST AND FOUND

A lad finds a penguin on his doorstep and resolutely sets out to return it in this briefly told import. 

Eventually, he ends up rowing it all the way back to Antarctica, braving waves and storms, filling in the time by telling it stories. But then, feeling lonely after he drops his silent charge off, he belatedly realizes that it was probably lonely too, and turns back to find it. Seeing Jeffers’s small, distant figures in wide, simply brushed land- and sea-scapes, young viewers will probably cotton to the penguin’s feelings before the boy himself does—but all’s well that ends well, and the reunited companions are last seen adrift together in the wide blue sea. 

Readers who (inexplicably) find David Lawrence’s Pickle and Penguin (2004) just too weird may settle in more comfortably with this—slightly—less offbeat friendship tale. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2006

ISBN: 0-399-24503-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Philomel

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2005

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