RUMBLE, ROAR, DINOSAUR!

MORE PREHISTORIC POEMS WITH LIFT-THE-FLAP SURPRISES

The team of Mitton and Chapman present dinosaur lovers with another collection of poems (Gnash, Gnaw, Dinosaur!, 2009). This one features a new cast of seven species and mixes a few facts about each with some outright fun. Deinosuchus, a giant ancestor of the crocodile, warns, “When I give a cheery grin, I may seem kind and happy, / but look out for my jagged jaws—they’re seriously… / snappy!” (this last is revealed when a flap is lifted). Other featured species include Compsognathus, Elasmosaurus, Stegosaurus, Hadrosaur, Archaeopteryx and Ankylosaurus. The author chooses a good blend of the popular and lesser-known dinos, as well as representatives from a variety of habitats. The scansion works, and the word choices nicely suit the target audience. The illustrator’s dinosaurs are brimming with personality (and a bit of artistic license), their faces adorned with eyebrows and eyelashes. The short length of the poems, humorous illustration and, of course, those ever-popular flaps all combine to make this a sure hit…but beware—exposure to these poems could transform children into Againosauruses. (Picture book/poetry. 3-6)

Pub Date: April 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-0-7534-1932-8

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Kingfisher

Review Posted Online: Jan. 3, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2010

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A kissing cousin to Bob Shea’s Dinosaur vs.… series.

DINOSAUR KISSES

Chomping and stomping come naturally to an exuberant dinosaur hatchling. Kissing? That takes practice.

Emerging from her egg at a run, Dinah STOMPS her fat legs and CHOMPS weeds with her sharp teeth. Kissing, though, turns out to be a challenge. After sending one hapless victim flying with a head butt and another inadvertently down the hatch (“Whoops,” she says. “Not good”), she returns to the hatchery…just in time to welcome a new sib with kisses—the sort that involve chomping, stomping and delighted head butts (“WHOMP!”). Drawn in thick outlines with a huge grin, wide eyes and a mottled yellow hide, Dinah stumps her way through minimally detailed prehistoric landscapes populated with anxious-looking smaller creatures. Children who groove on wimpy little butterfly kisses had best look elsewhere.

A kissing cousin to Bob Shea’s Dinosaur vs.… series. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Aug. 6, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-7636-6104-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 8, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2013

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Still, this young boy’s imagination is a powerful force for helping him deal with life, something that should be true for...

OLIVER AND HIS EGG

Oliver, of first-day-of-school alligator fame, is back, imagining adventures and still struggling to find balance between introversion and extroversion.

“When Oliver found his egg…” on the playground, mint-green backgrounds signifying Oliver’s flight into fancy slowly grow larger until they take up entire spreads; Oliver’s creature, white and dinosaurlike with orange polka dots, grows larger with them. Their adventures include sharing treats, sailing the seas and going into outer space. A classmate’s yell brings him back to reality, where readers see him sitting on top of a rock. Even considering Schmid’s scribbly style, readers can almost see the wheels turning in his head as he ponders the girl and whether or not to give up his solitary play. “But when Oliver found his rock… // Oliver imagined many adventures // with all his friends!” This last is on a double gatefold that opens to show the children enjoying the creature’s slippery curves. A final wordless spread depicts all the children sitting on rocks, expressions gleeful, wondering, waiting, hopeful. The illustrations, done in pastel pencil and digital color, again make masterful use of white space and page turns, although this tale is not nearly as funny or tongue-in-cheek as Oliver and His Alligator (2013), nor is its message as clear and immediately accessible to children.

Still, this young boy’s imagination is a powerful force for helping him deal with life, something that should be true for all children but sadly isn’t. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: July 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-4231-7573-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2014

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