This cheerful discussion of the changes puberty brings combines friendly, conversational advice from the author with signed...

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THE CARE AND KEEPING OF YOU

THE BODY BOOK FOR YOUNGER GIRLS, REV. ED.

Head-to-toe advice for preteen girls.

This cheerful discussion of the changes puberty brings combines friendly, conversational advice from the author with signed comments and questions, perhaps from preteens. Opening with general “Body Basics,” the text is organized by body part much like an exercise program. There are chapters on heads, breasts, bellies, the pubic area and legs. Within chapters, each spread covers a different topic. Braces, bra choice, acne, sports safety and sleep troubles are just a few examples. In some areas, the advice is quite specific: There are illustrated how-to instructions for shaving legs and using a menstrual pad. The girls shown represent considerable diversity in skin tones, hair and clothing. Lively design adds to the appeal of this growing-up guide, a revision of a popular title first published in 1998. The new illustrations are similar but feature darker skin shades, a greater range of pubescent girls and slightly more modern clothing. There are sporadic changes in the text that reflect new approaches to the use of sunscreen and new nutrition and sleep guidelines. Instructions for tampon insertion and definitions of eating disorders have been moved to the companion book for older girls, The Care and Keeping of You 2 (2012).

Pub Date: Feb. 26, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-60958-083-4

Page Count: 102

Publisher: American Girl

Review Posted Online: April 1, 2014

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This introduction to puberty may be particularly helpful for girls looking ahead to that stage.

THE GIRL'S BODY BOOK

A growing-up guide for preteen girls.

This puberty-navigation guide covers girls’ bodily changes, body care, health, relationships with family and friends, staying safe, and handling stress. In many cases the author, a registered nurse, has covered the same material as she did in various editions of this title as well as The Boy’s Body Book. This girls’ book skips the topics of sleep and performance-enhancement drugs in favor of a section on eating disorders. As in the boys’ book, controversial subjects are addressed generally and conservatively if at all. She includes a rough diagram of female reproductive organs and tells her young readers about menstruation and visiting a gynecologist but not how babies are made. She talks about having boys as friends, saying “Don’t put pressure on yourself to call any of your close friendships ‘dating.’ ” The strength of this title is its emphasis on good grooming, healthy living habits, and positive relationships. Added for this fourth edition is new material on interacting with adults, personal empowerment, body language, reputations, and “learning disabilities,” helpful information for the growing segment of the preteen population identified with cognitive and social learning differences. Tallardy’s cartoon illustrations show girls and adults of varying ethnicities and provide a cheerful accompaniment.

This introduction to puberty may be particularly helpful for girls looking ahead to that stage. (resources, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: Nov. 14, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-60433-714-3

Page Count: 148

Publisher: Cider Mill Press

Review Posted Online: Sept. 18, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2017

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One of those rare thrillers whose answers are even more scarifying than its mysteries.

AFTER ALL I'VE DONE

A middle-aged woman sidelined by a horrific accident finds even sharper pains waiting on the other side of her recuperation in this expert nightmare by Hardy, familiar to many readers as Megan Hart, author of All the Secrets We Keep (2017), etc.

Five months ago, while she was on her way to the hospital with an ailing gallbladder, Diana Sparrow’s car hit a deer on a rural Pennsylvania road. When she awoke, she was minus her gallbladder, two working collarbones (and therefore two functioning arms), and her memory. During a recovery that would’ve been impossible without the constant ministrations of Harriett Richmond, the mother-in-law who’s the real reason Diana married her husband, Jonathan, Diana’s discovered that Jonathan has been cheating on her with her childhood friend Valerie Delagatti. Divorce is out of the question: Diana’s grown used to the pampered lifestyle the prenup she’d signed would snatch away from her. Every day is filled with torments. She slips and falls in a pool of wine on her kitchen floor she’s sure she didn’t spill herself. At the emergency room, her credit card and debit card are declined. She feels that she hates oppressively solicitous Harriett but has no idea why. Her sessions with her psychiatrist fail to heal her rage at her adoptive mother, an addict who abandoned her then returned only to disappear again and die an ugly death. Even worse, her attempts to recover her lost memory lead to an excruciatingly paced series of revelations. Val says Diana asked her to seduce Jonathan. Diana realizes that Cole, a fellow student in her watercolor class, isn’t the stranger she’d thought he was. Where can this maze of deceptions possibly end?

One of those rare thrillers whose answers are even more scarifying than its mysteries.

Pub Date: Nov. 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-64385-470-0

Page Count: 310

Publisher: Crooked Lane

Review Posted Online: Aug. 19, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2020

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Great selections; not so great presentation.

KIDS CAN COOK

FUN AND YUMMY RECIPES FOR BUDDING CHEFS

This cookbook aims to build confidence in the kitchen.

This illustrated cookbook is presented in three sections, each one filled with traditional Western or culturally borrowed fare. “Breakfasts, snacks & breads” includes scrambled eggs on toast, two kinds of pancakes, muffins, quesadillas, skewers, sausage rolls, banana bread, mini frittatas, and flatbread. The section on “Main meals & sauces” includes pasta sauces, pizza, risotto, sliders, fajitas, fishcakes, and curry. “Sweet treats” include ice pops, apple pie, oatmeal bars, cupcakes, cookies, fudge, “gingerbread people,” and brownies. The typeface and the illustrations give this book an old-fashioned feel, but the equally retro-seeming line-and-color illustrations are neither realistic nor especially appetizing, so the volume doesn’t motivate readers to delve into cooking and eating the way cookbooks with photographs do. The recipes are well chosen for a young cook to develop a solid repertoire and confidence in the kitchen, and the opening pages on safety tips, equipment, and basic techniques are helpful. The instructions for the recipes are not broken down in an especially simple or clear way, however, so the collection ends up feeling like a very slim cookbook for general readers rather than a volume specifically aimed at children. This will work for older children or for highly motivated young chefs, but there are other books that do the same with a more attractive presentation and simpler instructions.

Great selections; not so great presentation. (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: Oct. 6, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-78708-071-3

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Button Books

Review Posted Online: Sept. 1, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2020

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