A book to welcome into all kinds of homes.

READ REVIEW

HOME AT LAST

Williams’ heartfelt text, published posthumously, supports Raschka’s expressive illustrations to tell the story of a child adopted by two dads.

At last, picture books featuring diverse family constellations are entering mainstream publishing in greater numbers, and Williams’ text does a fine job of depicting the complexities of adoption. This isn’t a story of a longed-for infant going happily-ever-after home to loving, adoptive parents. Lester is a boy of perhaps 6 who lived in a group home while Daddy Rich and Daddy Albert completed the adoption process. Lester and Daddy Albert seem white, with straight blond hair and light skin, while bearded Daddy Rich has a slightly darker complexion and curly dark hair, rendering his race ambiguous. The text opens on his homecoming day, and later, a few lines fill in Lester’s back story of loss. It touches on the range of emotions Lester feels as he learns to trust his new parents while also acknowledging the fathers’ struggle to adjust—especially Daddy Albert, who has “a big temper.” Raschka’s paintings (which backmatter says Williams helped him sketch before her death) add emotional depth to the setbacks, miscommunications, and moments of joy punctuating the lengthy text. At the book’s end, with the help of dog Wincka and extended family, too, Lester feels “truly home at last.”

A book to welcome into all kinds of homes. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 13, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-06-134973-7

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Review Posted Online: June 22, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2016

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This seemingly simple tale packs a satisfying emotional punch. Scarily good! (Picture book. 4-7)

LOVE MONSTER

Monster lives in Cutesville, where he feels his googly eyes make him unlovable, especially compared to all the “cute, fluffy” kittens, puppies and bunnies. He goes off to find someone who will appreciate him just the way he is…with funny and heartwarming results.

A red, scraggly, pointy-eared, arm-dragging monster with a pronounced underbite clutches his monster doll to one side of his chest, exposing a purplish blue heart on the other. His oversized eyes express his loneliness. Bright could not have created a more sympathetic and adorable character. But she further impresses with the telling of this poor chap’s journey. Since Monster is not the “moping-around sort,” he strikes out on his own to find someone who will love him. “He look[s] high” from on top of a hill, and “he look[s] low” at the bottom of the same hill. The page turn reveals a rolling (and labeled) tumbleweed on a flat stretch. Here “he look[s] middle-ish.” Careful pacing combines with dramatic design and the deadpan text to make this sad search a very funny one. When it gets dark and scary, he decides to head back home. A bus’s headlights shine on his bent figure. All seems hopeless—until the next page surprises, with a smiling, orange monster with long eyelashes and a pink heart on her chest depicted at the wheel. And “in the blink of a googly eye / everything change[s].”

This seemingly simple tale packs a satisfying emotional punch. Scarily good! (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: Dec. 31, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-374-34646-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: Sept. 18, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2013

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As insubstantial as hot air.

THE WORLD NEEDS WHO YOU WERE MADE TO BE

A diverse cast of children first makes a fleet of hot air balloons and then takes to the sky in them.

Lifestyle maven Gaines uses this activity as a platform to celebrate diversity in learning and working styles. Some people like to work together; others prefer a solo process. Some take pains to plan extensively; others know exactly what they want and jump right in. Some apply science; others demonstrate artistic prowess. But “see how beautiful it can be when / our differences share the same sky?” Double-page spreads leading up to this moment of liftoff are laid out such that rhyming abcb quatrains typically contain one or two opposing concepts: “Some of us are teachers / and share what we know. / But all of us are learners. / Together is how we grow!” In the accompanying illustration, a bespectacled, Asian-presenting child at a blackboard lectures the other children on “balloon safety.” Gaines’ text has the ring of sincerity, but the sentiment is hardly an original one, and her verse frequently sacrifices scansion for rhyme. Sometimes it abandons both: “We may not look / or work or think the same, / but we all have an / important part to play.” Swaney’s delicate, pastel-hued illustrations do little to expand on the text, but they are pretty. (This book was reviewed digitally with 11.2-by-18.6-inch double-page spreads viewed at 70.7% of actual size.)

As insubstantial as hot air. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Nov. 10, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-4003-1423-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Tommy Nelson

Review Posted Online: Jan. 19, 2021

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