Books by Charles G. Waugh

A NEWBERY ZOO by Martin H. Greenberg
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1995

"There are biographical notes on each of the authors at the end, making this useful for teachers wishing to introduce the award-winning authors through read-aloud selections, or where there is a demand for materials of good literary quality that do not require long attention spans. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Third in an anthology series based on the work of Newbery Medal-winning authors (following A Newbery Christmas, 1991 and A Newbery Halloween, 1993). Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1989

"Generously proportioned, agreeably priced, and most certainly worthwhile."
Another "Mammoth Book of. . ." Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 1989

"Overall, an anthology of interest primarily to occult-fiction completists."
The authors collected here should know about the occult—nearly all of them are dead. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 1989

"Overall, an anthology of interest primarily to occult-fiction completists."
The authors collected here should know about the occult—nearly all of them are dead. Read full book review >
Released: July 15, 1988

"Worth a try for nostalgia buffs and students of the field."
Compared with the works of the founders of modern sf, H.G. Wells and Jules Verne, those of the 1930's, contrary to the overblown title, often seem insufferably crude; even the better craftsmen of the era were prone to excessive verbiage, prose that was more puce than purple, cartoon characters and antics, and rickety or nonexistent plots—all of which are on ample display here. Read full book review >
Released: July 1, 1987

"Good addition to a popular series of theme anthologies."
These ten very different tales feature young magic-workers, and will appeal to a variety of readers. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 18, 1985

"A few goodies, then, but generally mediocre and disappointing."
Alert readers expect a certain amount of bombast from editors of "best of" anthologies; but, as Asimov remarks in his introduction (his emphasis): "I don't know any great scientists who are great science fiction writers." Read full book review >
Released: April 30, 1984

"Except for a foolish 1937 pulp piece about antimatter, then: an attention-worthy gathering—even if the arbitrariness of the assemblage irritates."
Another "best of" collection, with a particularly tenuous premise: twelve stories, 1839-1966—representing the "first appearance of an interesting idea" (though even here Asimov quibbles a bit). Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 12, 1982

"Entertaining, often YA-ish, certainly browse-worthy tales—but, overall, mutton dressed as lamb."
Forget the pretentious "dictionary" label: this admittedly mammoth, 50-piece collection—with its contrived categories ("knights," "judicial system," "women," etc.) and haft-witted definitions ("children—persons between infancy and puberty; the offspring of human beings")—is just another gab-bag, despite the noisy packaging. Read full book review >
Released: March 22, 1982

"All in all, then: a spotty collection that's inferior in most respects—including introductory material—to Hoch's own much more generous All But Impossible anthology (1981)."
Neither of the locked-room masters—John Dickson Carr and Clayton Rawson—is represented in this collection of twelve stories; for classics, the editors turn instead to three of the most over-familiar items imaginable (Poe's "Rue Morgue," Conan Doyle's "Speckled Band," and Futrelle's "Cell 13"). Read full book review >
THE 13 CRIMES OF SCIENCE FICTION by Isaac Asimov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 1979

"Some marvelous material, but a strained anthology."
Though a good deal better than Malzberg-and-Pronzini's Dark Sins, Dark Dreams (1978), this crime/sf anthology makes you wonder whether maybe the idea itself is jinxed. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 31, 1979

"An eminently well-designed collection."
An old-fashioned anthology of old-fashioned virtues: there's not much in the way of stylistic fireworks or conspicuously labeled profundity here, but rather a clear projection of the relationship between material and treatment that distinguishes the science-fiction form. Read full book review >