Books by Martin H. Greenberg

SHERLOCK HOLMES IN AMERICA by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2009

"The volume closes with Walsh's irrelevant essay on Doyle's anti-Irish streak; Christopher Redmond's account of the author's first visit to America; and Doyle's own speech "The Romance of America," which sets a stylistic standard no other contribution can match."
Think the Great Detective never set foot in the United States? Think again. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 2008

"Since the collection depends heavily on brand names, 2007 can't even be described as what baseball managers call a building year. Wait till next year is more like it."
The latest installment of the annual anthology suggests that it hasn't been a vintage year for the mystery short story. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 16, 2007

"Still, six out of 21 isn't bad."
Five of this year's crop are first-rate, one is truly superb—and the rest? Well, never mind those. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"The cleverest stories are by Breen and Wheat, the edgiest by Estleman. A prize should be reserved for the anthologist who comes up with a higher concept than this one."
Finally, a collection of new Sherlock Holmes pastiches based on a promising idea: conflicts between the great detective's super-rational nature and hints of the supernatural. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"Also appearing: Charlie Stella's gay priests, Val McDermid's non-award-winning author, Laura Lippman's shoeshine man and lesser entries by Francis M. Nevins, Martyn Waits, Joyce Carol Oates and many, many more."
Skip the extensive but mostly superfluous introductory essays on the year 2004 in mystery and dive into the generous and much more compelling evidence. Read full book review >
THE WORLD’S FINEST MYSTERY AND CRIME STORIES by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

If 2000 was, on the evidence of Gorman and Greenberg's previous behemoth, a banner year for crime fiction, 2001 was, as baseball managers say, a "building year." Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

For their second installment of the series that began last year, veteran anthologists Gorman and Greenberg have pulled out all the stops in an ambitious attempt to produce the definitive yearbook of the short mystery. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

Now that he's survived 60 stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, countless parodies and pastiches, and even two Christmases (Greenberg and Lellenberg's More Holmes for the Holidays, 1999, etc.), what new worlds are left for Sherlock Holmes to conquer? Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

Brightly conceived, even though the most widely known alternative history tale of modern times is ignored, James Cameron's Terminator II. Read full book review >

PULP MASTERS by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"The two exceptions are James M. Cain, whose tricky valentine "The Embezzler" is vintage Cain, and Mickey Spillane, who, despite the absence of Mike Hammer from "Everybody's Watching Me," sounds, for better or worse, exactly like Spillane.

"

The biggest revelation of these five pulp novelettes, 1938-77, and Harry Whittington's 1953 short novel So Dead My Love is how much more their common voices and formulas, often displayed in apprentice work, make then sound like each other than like the eventually famous authors—John D. MacDonald (a fraternity killer), Lawrence Block (a stag-party killer), Donald E. Westlake (a sad, crimeless anti-romance)—you thought you knew. Read full book review >

MORE HOLMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 11, 1999

Whatever the reason—maybe something off in the mince pie or the plum pudding—these 11 Sherlockian Yuletides tap the same vein as Holmes for the Holidays (1996), but to less effect. Read full book review >

NIGHTMARE TOWN by Dashiell Hammett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 4, 1999

This collection of 20 stories, most of them out of print for many years, is must reading for hardboiled fans. Read full book review >

CAT CRIMES THROUGH TIME by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1999

Not content with its dominion over the present (Cat Crimes for the Holidays, 1997, etc.), the master race now extends its reach back through history from ancient Egypt to the mid-20th century. Read full book review >

THE YEAR'S 25 FINEST CRIME AND MYSTERY STORIES by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

Professionalism rather than originality is the keynote of this seventh annual collection. Read full book review >

ONCE UPON A CRIME by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1998

Most fairy tales are already so full of innocent victims, monstrous malefactors, and sudden violence that it doesn't take much of a push to send them over the edge into the realm of crime fiction, as in this overstuffed collection of 24 brand-new stories. Read full book review >

CAT CRIMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 1997

Nineteen new stories commemorating not just the December holidays but a veritable calendar of cats, from New Year's (Barbara Paul) to Martin Luther King Day (Jon L. Breen), Valentine's Day (Jeremiah Healy), Presidents' Day (Peter Crowther and Stewart von Allmen), St. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

Regional humorist Hess (The Maggody Militia, p. 175, etc.) joins series editors Gorman and Greenberg for this sixth annual roundup. Read full book review >

AMERICAN PULP by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

Or American Digest, since editors Gorman and Greenberg (Love Kills, p. 595, etc.), joined by veteran Pronzini (A Wasteland of Strangers, p. 914, etc.), contend that the true high-water mark of short noir fiction was the period from 1950 to 1970, after Black Mask and its ilk had already been killed off by inexpensive paperbacks and TV, and digests like Manhunt and Pursuit reigned supreme. Read full book review >

LOVE KILLS by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1997

Not only does it kill, but it makes you feel really creepy first—whether your pleasure is loving homicide (Sandra Scoppettone, Richard T. Chizmar), romantic betrayal (John Lutz, Jerry Sykes, Dorothy B. Hughes, editor Gorman), sour marriages (Bill Pronzini, Peter Crowther, Ron Goulart, Joe Hensley, Bill Crider), hints of the supernatural (Edward Bryant, Larry Segriff, Barbara Collins, Greg Cox), sexual taboos (Morris Hershman, Marthayn Pelegrimas, Richard Deming, Jonathan Craig), stalkers and other obsessives (Nancy Pickard, Marcia Muller, Brian Lawrence, Maxim Jakubowski, Lawrence Block, Ruth Rendell), vengeance served cold (James Reasoner, Max Allan Collins), or just plain bad relationships (Evan Hunter, Jim Combs, Donald Westlake). Read full book review >

GREAT WRITERS AND KIDS WRITE MYSTERY STORIES by Martin H. Greenberg
HORROR AND GHOST STORIES
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

Sleuths eager for less formulaic company than Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys will enjoy this pulse-quickening second collection of collaborations between writers and children (Great Writers and Kids Write Spooky Stories, 1995, not reviewed). A brief introduction by Morgan and Weinberg defines the elements of a good mystery, as well as its many sub-genres (the cozy, the police procedural, etc.), then the fun begins as bodies start to drop. Read full book review >

HOLMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

If the prospect of 14 pastiches all featuring Christmas and Sherlock Holmes makes you queasy, take heart: Everyone involved produces professional, if not exactly inspired, work. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1996

Alternate-world yarns exert an endless fascination: for one, because other worlds are scientifically respectable (modern particle theory admits the possibility); for another, the godlike power offered by historical what-ifs (for instance, what-if the Nazis had won WW II? Read full book review >

DINOSAURS by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 30, 1996

Fourteen more or less archosaurian variations, 195094, compiled by the veteran anthologizer. Read full book review >

Released: Dec. 16, 1995

From anthologists Friesner (Alien Pregnant by Elvis) and Greenberg (Sisters of the Night, p. 1046, etc.): an inspired collection of 32 stories tying art to vampirism, or the reverse, the arts being painting, music, film, sculpture, dance, writing, and such special exhibits as window glazing, weaving (with bloodstained flax), puppetry, architecture, collage, jewelry- making, and guerrilla mural art with spray cans. The contributors here are largely unknown, but, even so, the standouts are too many to praise. Read full book review >

DARK LOVE by Nancy A. Collins
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

Twenty-two delvings into horror, lust, madness, flying blood, and defiled flesh. Anthologists Collins (the paperback Wild Blood, etc.), Kramer, and Greenberg kick off their album of original tales with Stephen King's delightful study in grisliness, ``Lunch at the Gotham Cafe''about a broker whose wife has left him and who meets her and her therapist in a Manhattan eatery for lunch and talk; there, the three are mistaken by a nutty mÉitre d' as the people whose dog keeps him awake all night, following which the bedeviled fellow goes berserk, pulls out a butcher knife and works them over. Read full book review >

SISTERS OF THE NIGHT by Barbara Hambly
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

Surprisingly crisp and inventive vampire tales about sisters with fangs. Editors Hambly (Traveling with the Dead, see below) and sf- fantasy-mystery anthologist Greenberg hit on a happy idea when asking 14 writers, including Hambly, to write about ``the woman as vampire: loving that absorbs and destroys the lover; the moth going willingly to the flame. Read full book review >

NEW LEGENDS by Greg Bear
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Nonpareil."
This original anthology of 15 stories and an essaya collection that, Bear hopes, amounts to "science fiction with a great soul"is divided into six sections: "Choices," "Growing Up," "Them and Us," "Win, Lose, or Draw," "Redemption," and "Ciphers,"all themes familiar from Bear's own fiction (Moving Mars, 1993, etc.). Read full book review >
CAT CRIMES TAKES A VACATION by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 24, 1995

The editors' series of Cat Crimes anthologies hits bottom with this sixth installment. Read full book review >

A NEWBERY ZOO by Martin H. Greenberg
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1995

Third in an anthology series based on the work of Newbery Medal-winning authors (following A Newbery Christmas, 1991 and A Newbery Halloween, 1993). Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

Twenty-three pretty unoriginal original short stories set in the American West, gathered by perennial bestseller Jakes (Homeland, not reviewed, etc.) and anthologizing editor Greenberg (Christmas Out West, not reviewed, etc.). Diversity turns out to be a drawback in this collection. Read full book review >

GRAILS by Richard Gilliam
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

Companion to, and continuation of, the first and fairly mediocre Grails (p. 102). Read full book review >

Released: March 1, 1994

Actually, not quite original: Grails first appeared in 1992 as a 200,000-word hardcover limited to 1,000 copies. Read full book review >

DANGER IN D.C. by Martin H. Greenberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 1993

You either like cat mysteries or you don't, and this tepid collection of 20 all-new stories won't change your mind either way. Read full book review >

CONFEDERACY OF THE DEAD by Richard Gilliam
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 14, 1993

Anthology comprising 25 original entries illustrating the Civil War from a generally supernatural vantage. Read full book review >

PREDATORS by Ed Gorman
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

Suspense-oriented horror anthology of 21 stories, awash in slice-and-dice, that's nearly indistinguishable from its so-so predecessor, Stalkers (1989). Several authors from that earlier volume encore here, perhaps most notably Dean Koontz—though his energetic ``Hardscrabble,'' a cop-vs.-alien yarn, appeared in the Night Visions 4 anthology (1987). Read full book review >

MURASAKI by Robert Silverberg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 1992

Shared-world anthology (of Harlan Ellison's 1985 Medea), using a scenario created by two veteran writers, Poul Anderson and Frederik Pohl (the inspiration here is, of course, the poet Lady Murasaki's famous 11th-century Tale of Genji), and featuring stories by them and the stellar lineup of David Brin, Gregory Benford, Greg Bear, and Nancy Kress. Murasaki is a red dwarf sun whose double planets, Genji and Chujo, orbit each other. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 15, 1992

Omnipresent anthologists Gorman and Greenberg suggested to 18 writers that each pound out a story that included one common element: a young woman found dead on an apartment floor. Read full book review >

AFTER THE KING by Martin H. Greenberg
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1992

Yet another Festschrift anthology by Greenberg, who has recently edited or coedited tributes to Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, and H.P. Lovecraft, this time to honor the much-imitated author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. Read full book review >

SOLVED by Ed Gorman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 14, 1991

Sixteen short stories—some puckish, several conspiracy- oriented, and all never-published-before (for good reason)—that rework and supposedly ``solve'' various real-life notable mysteries. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

A sheaf of 23 original stories in tribute to Ray Bradbury's 50 years in fantasy and science fiction. Among the more celebrated authors that were gathered to honor Bradbury's 350 editions in 30 countries around the world are Isaac Asimov (with a tribute), Orson Scott Card, Gregory Benford, Charles L. Grant, Richard Matheson, F. Paul Wilson, Norman Corwin, Robert Sheckley, the late Charles Beaumont and his son Christopher Beaumont (his debut short story)—and Bradbury himself, who offers ``The Troll,'' a lost story (but one of his best!) from 1950 that Bradbury repolished for Nolan. Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 30, 1991

"Scary stories, labored stories, funny stories—after this, no one could claim that when you've seen one vampire you've seen them all. Not for everybody, but (mostly) good clean fun for enthusiasts. (Fiction. 10+)"
Thirteen tales, at least one for every taste (as long as it's blood): mall-rat vampires, pious Jewish vampires, squeamish vampires, and shaman vampires; vampires accepted, rejected, or defeated. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 16, 1991

Seventeen new if not overly original stories guaranteed to give you paws—if not pause. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1989

"Generously proportioned, agreeably priced, and most certainly worthwhile."
Another "Mammoth Book of. . ." Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 1989

The authors collected here should know about the occult—nearly all of them are dead. Read full book review >

Released: April 1, 1989

"Overall, an anthology of interest primarily to occult-fiction completists."
The authors collected here should know about the occult—nearly all of them are dead. Read full book review >
Released: July 15, 1988

"Worth a try for nostalgia buffs and students of the field."
Compared with the works of the founders of modern sf, H.G. Wells and Jules Verne, those of the 1930's, contrary to the overblown title, often seem insufferably crude; even the better craftsmen of the era were prone to excessive verbiage, prose that was more puce than purple, cartoon characters and antics, and rickety or nonexistent plots—all of which are on ample display here. Read full book review >
Released: July 1, 1987

"Good addition to a popular series of theme anthologies."
These ten very different tales feature young magic-workers, and will appeal to a variety of readers. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 18, 1985

"A few goodies, then, but generally mediocre and disappointing."
Alert readers expect a certain amount of bombast from editors of "best of" anthologies; but, as Asimov remarks in his introduction (his emphasis): "I don't know any great scientists who are great science fiction writers." Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 28, 1984

"Filled out with mediocre contributions from Arthur C. Clarke, Frank Herbert, Robert A. Heinlein, Stanley Schmidt, and Larry Eisenberg: topical yet often bland fare—good enough for politically-oriented diversion, too un-probing to please serious sf fans."
A circumscribed and rather tentative collection of 17 tales, 1941-75. Read full book review >
Released: April 30, 1984

"Except for a foolish 1937 pulp piece about antimatter, then: an attention-worthy gathering—even if the arbitrariness of the assemblage irritates."
Another "best of" collection, with a particularly tenuous premise: twelve stories, 1839-1966—representing the "first appearance of an interesting idea" (though even here Asimov quibbles a bit). Read full book review >
100 GREAT FANTASY SHORT SHORT STORIES by Isaac Asimov
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 9, 1984

"But the overall effect is numbing rather than stimulating: one of the Asimov factory's less workable ideas for an anthology."
Teeny-weeny tales—so teeny-weeny that the table of contents is longer than any of the entries here. Read full book review >
RELIGION
Released: Oct. 13, 1983

"A disjointed, artificial assemblage—that still might find favor in a few origin-pondering classrooms, as well as with ardent Asimovians."
Factual, speculative, and mythical ideas about origins—concerning (in four separate parts) the universe, the solar system, the Earth, and humankind—via a peculiar, confusing mix of materials: four scriptural selections, four straightforward science pieces, 17 fantasy/sf stories from 1933-81, a poem, and a recent Asimov essay refuting Creationism. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 30, 1983

"A shapeless and rather parochial collection (notable absentees include Aldiss, Simak, and Lem)—but there's no shortage of high-quality, if often familiar, material."
An over-eclectic assemblage of 29 yarns, one from 1894, the rest 1932-76, running to a hefty 550-plus pages—and arranged more or less chronologically in the usual fairly meaningless categories. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 12, 1982

"Entertaining, often YA-ish, certainly browse-worthy tales—but, overall, mutton dressed as lamb."
Forget the pretentious "dictionary" label: this admittedly mammoth, 50-piece collection—with its contrived categories ("knights," "judicial system," "women," etc.) and haft-witted definitions ("children—persons between infancy and puberty; the offspring of human beings")—is just another gab-bag, despite the noisy packaging. Read full book review >
THE SCIENCE FICTION WEIGHT-LOSS BOOK by Isaac Asimov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 22, 1982

"Simply scrumptious—however familiar some items on the menu."
At first glance this might appear an implausible anthology idea—but the upshot is a deliciously varied and diverting set of 15 yarns, from H. G. Wells to the present, examining obesity in all its ghastly guises. Read full book review >
Released: March 22, 1982

"All in all, then: a spotty collection that's inferior in most respects—including introductory material—to Hoch's own much more generous All But Impossible anthology (1981)."
Neither of the locked-room masters—John Dickson Carr and Clayton Rawson—is represented in this collection of twelve stories; for classics, the editors turn instead to three of the most over-familiar items imaginable (Poe's "Rue Morgue," Conan Doyle's "Speckled Band," and Futrelle's "Cell 13"). Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 8, 1981

"One misses the lighter British touch here, perhaps (and the one Michael Gilbert piece is disappointing), but mystery readers who like a light five-minute read just before bed (or between bus stops) will find this a solid source of mild mini-pleasures."
A generous collection of "short-shorts"—crime stories whose brevity (2000 words or less) is often their major attraction; most of the plot twists here are familiar, but there's no time for the belaboring or padding that afflict so many of the longer mystery-magazine stories. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 27, 1980

"Not for serious sf folk, and no substantial nutrition for anybody—but a serviceable enough bedside anthology for those who get a yen for just a taste of something silly or tricky before going to sleep."
One hundred miniature sf short stories, most of them too gimmicky to induce more than a shrug—but a few old pros do provide some mini-pleasure. Read full book review >
THE 13 CRIMES OF SCIENCE FICTION by Isaac Asimov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 1979

"Some marvelous material, but a strained anthology."
Though a good deal better than Malzberg-and-Pronzini's Dark Sins, Dark Dreams (1978), this crime/sf anthology makes you wonder whether maybe the idea itself is jinxed. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 31, 1979

"An eminently well-designed collection."
An old-fashioned anthology of old-fashioned virtues: there's not much in the way of stylistic fireworks or conspicuously labeled profundity here, but rather a clear projection of the relationship between material and treatment that distinguishes the science-fiction form. Read full book review >
Released: Feb. 10, 1977

"A pretty well-designed collection for reference or desultory browsing, not for consecutive reading."
A hundred shiny little items with all the variety and dimension of a miniature automobile collection salvaged from the breakfast cereal. Read full book review >

The first anthology of Japanese sf stories to appear in English translation—"sf" used very loosely to embrace fantasy, surrealism, and horror: 13 tales, 1963-89, offering fascinating cross-cultural sidelights and echoes of themes and treatments by more familiar writers, the best ranking with the finest stories anywhere. Read full book review >