Books by Eric Carle

WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE ANIMAL? by Eric Carle
Released: Jan. 21, 2014

"This menagerie offers picture-book lovers of all ages a glimpse into each creator's style, personality and brand of humor. (biographies, photographs, websites) (Picture book. 4-8)"
Cause-related anthologies are challenging to do well, but this one (benefiting the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art) succeeds admirably—on multiple levels. Read full book review >
FRIENDS by Eric Carle
by Eric Carle, illustrated by Eric Carle
Released: Nov. 19, 2013

"Nevertheless, children will identify with the longing to be with distant loved ones and will revel in the sheer joy of Carle's forms, colors and textures. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Carle revisits the timeless topic that he explored with Kazuo Iwamura in the bilingual animal journey Where Are You Going? To See My Friend! (2001); this time, a boy yearns for the girl who moved away. Read full book review >
THE ARTIST WHO PAINTED A BLUE HORSE by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"Eye-catching fun. (Picture book. 2-5)"
This bright new entry by an old pro should find a place on the long shelf of picture books about animals and colors. Read full book review >
THE RABBIT AND THE TURTLE by Aesop
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2008

In this freshened-up reissue of Twelve Tales from Aesop (1980), the art goes to full-page and is reprinted in bright, glowing colors, while the familiar fables have been rearranged and given explicit morals. Read full book review >
BABY BEAR, BABY BEAR, WHAT DO YOU SEE? by Bill Martin, Jr.
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"Martin died in 2004—here's a fitting close to what will likely remain his most lasting work for children. (Picture book. 3-5)"
In its fourth—and billed as final—iteration, this primary level Q-and-A introduces ten North American mammals, from red fox and blue heron to rattlesnake, mule deer and finally (unspecified, but possibly Kodiak) Mama Bear. Read full book review >
10 LITTLE RUBBER DUCKS by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"Audiences of one or many will enjoy it, especially if they get to press the duck and make him squeak. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Ten rubber ducks are packed in a box and tied to a boat. Read full book review >
MISTER SEAHORSE by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2004

"The simple, thoughtfully told story includes repetitive phrases and a predictable structure with an emotionally satisfying ending as Mr. Seahorse sends his babies out into the watery world. (Picture book. 2-6)"
The striking single seahorse gracing the cover of this tribute to aquatic fatherhood could never be mistaken as anything other than one of Carle's consummately creative collage creatures. Read full book review >
WHERE ARE YOU GOING? TO SEE MY FRIEND! by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: April 1, 2003

"This will be especially welcome in communities with a Japanese population. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A unique venture between two friends, who happen to be famous artists. Read full book review >
“SLOWLY, SLOWLY, SLOWLY,” SAID THE SLOTH by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"There is room in everyone's life for a little peace and quiet, and this introduction to an animal that is the epitome of tranquillity will be welcome at bedtime, or anytime. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Carle (Dream Snow, 2000, etc.) branches out to feature a lesser-known yet fascinating animal in a paean to taking it easy. Read full book review >
DREAM SNOW by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Cotton candy. (Picture book. 4-7)"
The venerable and prolific Carle (Hello, Red Fox, 1998, etc.) offers a quiet Christmas story with a little music at the end. Read full book review >
HELLO, RED FOX by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1998

Carle (From Head to Toe, 1997) asks readers to engage in optical illusions to view his illustrations for a story that becomes an unforgettable lesson in complementary colors. Read full book review >
FROM HEAD TO TOE by Eric Carle
HEALTH
Released: April 11, 1997

"Linda Lowery's Twist With a Burger, Jitter With a Bug (1995) inspires similar participation, but is a more rhythmic and vivacious book. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Carle (Little Cloud, 1996, etc.) takes as his premise that animals don't have to go to the gym—their natural movements give them plenty of exercise. Read full book review >
THE ART OF ERIC CARLE by Eric Carle
Released: Sept. 4, 1996

"Throughout are photographs and reproductions of art; the book closes with more samples of Carle's work and an international bibliography of his published books. (Autobiography. 8+)"
An agreeable overview of Carle's life and work, a consideration of the genesis of his ideas, a look at how he fashions his collages, and admiring words from some of his colleagues. Read full book review >
LITTLE CLOUD by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: April 6, 1996

"The result is a philosophical suggestion, scaled to a child's sensibility, as open to interpretation as the passing clouds. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A sophisticated idea deftly packed into a simple text. Read full book review >
THE VERY LONELY FIREFLY by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 1995

"The finished book is to include battery-powered flashing tails; an author's note appears on the book jacket. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Twenty-five years after The Very Hungry Caterpillar (1968) ate his way through a remarkable book, another Very book, about a firefly in search of company, shows a master of bold, dramatic design in search of a story. Read full book review >
THE APRON by Eric Carle
by Eric Carle, illustrated by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: Sept. 15, 1994

"Magnificent illustrations, the story is filler. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 5+)"
As an eight-year-old boy, Carle (Today is Monday, 1993, etc.) spent two vacation days with his Aunt Elizabeth and Uncle Adam. Read full book review >
TODAY IS MONDAY by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"Music included, but the song isn't sourced. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Carle's illustrations for this catchy, lighthearted cumulative song ("...today is Tuesday, Tuesday spaghetti, Monday string beans, All you hungry children Come and eat it up") originally appeared in 1977 as a frieze; they are even more welcome in this attractive book showing a porcupine eating the beans, an elephant slopping up Wednesday's "ZOOOOP," a cat snitching Thursday's roast beef, and so on. Read full book review >
DRAW ME A STAR by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: Sept. 16, 1992

"Thanks be to the book for asking Carle to "draw" it! (Picture book. 3+)"
A remarkable, quintessentially simple book encompassing Creation, creativity, and the cycle of life within the eternal. Read full book review >
POLAR BEAR, POLAR BEAR, WHAT DO YOU HEAR? by Bill Martin, Jr.
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Brown Bear special. (Picture book. 2- 6)"
After a full generation, a companion to a perennial favorite (Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?, 1967). Read full book review >
ERIC CARLE'S DRAGONS DRAGONS by Laura Whipple
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Sept. 18, 1991

"Index. (Poetry/Picture book. 3+)"
A second well-chosen, gorgeously illustrated collection of poetry in the style of Animals Animals (1989). Read full book review >
ERIC CARLE'S ANIMALS ANIMALS by Laura Whipple
POETRY
Released: Aug. 17, 1989

"A treat!"
First, a word for the anthologist: the 62 poems Whipple has assembled as companions to Carle's flamboyant art are so splendid that they could easily stand alone; such greats as Dickinson, Sandburg, and Kipling appear along with numerous children's favorites—e.g., Worth, Behn, Coatsworth. Read full book review >
ERIC CARLE'S TREASURY OF CLASSIC STORIES by Hans Christian Andersen
FICTION
Released: April 1, 1988

"Not a primary purchase, but a fair additional one."
Twenty-two folk and fairy tales assembled from the author-illustrator's previous collections from Aesop (11), Andersen (7), and Grimm (4), which are all currently out of print, with emphasis on less familiar stories. Read full book review >
A HOUSE FOR A HERMIT CRAB by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: March 15, 1988

"Fine for picture book hour or private sharing."
Month by month, a hermit crab gathers other sea creatures (anemone, starfish, coral, etc.) to decorate his shell home; as the year ends, it is comfortably familiar and suits him perfectly—but (as often happens with human habitations in young readers' experience) has become too small. Read full book review >
WATCH OUT!  A GIANT! by Eric Carle
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Oct. 19, 1978

"But it's not worth trying to follow, as the distractions overwhelm."
This is one of Carle's junkier gimmicks, with all sorts of peep holes through pages and trap doors that open, but these cutouts are not coordinated with the rudimentary story and many are not even coordinated with the other pictures they open onto. Read full book review >
ALL ABOUT ARTHUR by Eric Carle
Released: Sept. 1, 1974

"However, Carle's colored closeup photos — of the Bloomingdale B, Luchow's neon L, and other brass, tile, raised or painted upper case letters on variously textured surfaces — do give children a new and open ended way of viewing their ABC's."
"In Atlanta one autumn day an absolutely absurd accordion-playing ape named Arthur felt all alone." Read full book review >
WHY NOAH CHOSE THE DOVE by Elizabeth Shub
RELIGION
Released: March 15, 1974

"Of course the sheer scale and number of animals on parade could make this a nursery success."
Eric Carle couldn't ask for a more suitable showcase than Singer's short and obvious fable about how an elephant, a lion, a fox and 31 other animals vie to be taken onto the ark — each one claiming priority on grounds of being strongest, largest, cleverest, or whatever. Read full book review >
I SEE A SONG by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: April 23, 1973

"A similarly patched violinist bowing at the start and finish is a reminder that it's all to be viewed as visual music — we'd call it sounding brass."
Eric Carle's admirers will no doubt be dazzled by these childlike paint and paper collages, full of splash and color but signifying next to nothing. Read full book review >
VERY LONG TRAIN by Eric Carle
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 6, 1972

"This might do to decorate the top of the picture book cases if there were not so many picture books with more attractive covers and more rewarding contents."
Wordless non-books, each folded to a trim 8fl x 6(apple) but reaching when opened the Very Long dimensions promised in the titles. Read full book review >
WALTER THE BAKER by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: March 22, 1972

"The splashy tissue-paper collages of coarsely comic peasant figures and a cozy half-timbered town are as pointlessly hybrid as the tale."
Beginning invitingly with "warm smells" of bread, rolls, cakes, tarts and cookies (and a cat perched on a red-brick oven) Walter the baker's story ends lamely when he invents the pretzel in answer to the duke's demand for a roll containing "the rising sun, the noontime sun and the setting sun" (the pretzel, Walter explains, has three holes through which the sun can shine). Read full book review >
THE SECRET BIRTHDAY MESSAGE by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: Feb. 21, 1972

"The last double page retraces the whole route so that readers can "find (their) way back," but they'll be better off avoiding the whole misguided tour."
A gimmick for the book store trade, full of cut-outs and peep holes and childlike splashes, all leading (into a cave, down some stairs, through a door, etc.) to a big-eared puppy posed cutely in a basket with a "happy birthday" tag. Read full book review >
PANCAKES, PANCAKES! by Eric Carle
FICTION
Released: Oct. 26, 1970

"A likely idea, an unprepossessing presentation."
Like Pelle's new suit but without its incidental pleasantries, Jack's breakfast pancake is a joint enterprise: wheat from the field, flour from the miller, an egg from the hen, milk from the cow, plus, via Jack, butter from the churn, wood from the woodshed and strawberry jam from the cellar. Read full book review >
THE TINY SEED by Eric Carle
NATURE
Released: Sept. 21, 1970

"So scaled, the illustrations are gross in either sense of the word."
The unnatural history of a seed smaller than the others ("Will it be able to keep up. . . ?") that sails on while one, flying too high, is burned up by the sun (flames, yet) and a second "falls into the water and drowns." Read full book review >