Books by Fiona Roberton

A TALE OF TWO BEASTS by Fiona Roberton
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2015

"Totally delightful. (Picture book. 3-7)"
What really happened in the woods?Read full book review >
CUCKOO! by Fiona Roberton
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 10, 2014

"A sweet, if uneven, tale. (Picture book. 4-7)"
In something of a variant on Andersen's "Ugly Duckling," Cuckoo searches for someone who might understand him. Read full book review >
THE PERFECT PRESENT by Fiona Roberton
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2012

"Utterly charming. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Spot the duck became Henry's pet when he disguised himself as a dog in Wanted: The Perfect Pet (2010), and in what initially feels like a cruel twist of a sequel, he seems at risk of displacement by Henry's new pet. Read full book review >
PORKCHOP & MOUSE by Fiona Roberton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 18, 2012

"It's a simple story that emphasizes fun over substance, but the visuals are so crisp and adorable that they'll appeal to readers who are looking for less-traditional art styles in their storybooks. (iPad storybook app. 2-8)"
More Hello Kitty than Peter Rabbit, this very modern app with minimalist illustrations and clever jokes tucked throughout is a cute, if lightweight, cat-and-mouse story. Read full book review >
WANTED: THE PERFECT PET by Fiona Roberton
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2010

Henry wants a dog. He has an extensive collection of frogs, but frogs are boring. "I want a pet with personality," he tells his mother. So Henry does what any little boy would do and advertises in the local paper, the Daily Catastrophe. Enter Duck. Duck is a lonely, nameless bird with no friends. He sees Henry's ad in the paper and naturally decides to dress up as a dog and answer the ad. During the interview, however, Duck is found out. Henry decides to take in the poor duck anyway and discovers that he may have met his perfect pet after all. Roberton makes this fantastic silliness work by choosing to take her characters seriously and letting her simple, even childlike, tongue-in-cheek drawings do much of the comedic work. The story maintains a consistently funny edge, features characters kids will empathize with and includes some hilarious highlights, such as the outrageous classified ads ("FOR FREE: Enchanted Mirror / Always speaks the truth"). Some of this may go over little heads, but adults need to laugh too. Extremely entertaining, with lots of warmth at its heart. (Picture book. 4-6) Read full book review >