Books by Ian Lendler

THE FIRST DINOSAUR by Ian Lendler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 8, 2019

"An outstanding case study in how science is actually done: funny, nuanced, and perceptive. (bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 10-15)"
How does a new, truly revolutionary idea become established scientific fact? Read full book review >
THE ABSOLUTELY, POSITIVELY NO PRINCESSES BOOK by Ian Lendler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 3, 2018

"Fun but limiting. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A young narrator insists that her book will never include princesses—right up until the moment that a princess shows up. Read full book review >
ONE DAY A DOT by Ian Lendler
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 17, 2018

"Sugarcoated nursery didactics. (timeline) (Informational picture book. 3-6)"
For preschoolers, an introduction to ideas referencing the Big Bang, evolution, and more. Read full book review >
LITTLE SID by Ian Lendler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 23, 2018

"Skip. (Picture book. 5-10)"
Little princeling Sid leaves the palace seeking what he lacks. Read full book review >
SATURDAY by Ian Lendler
by Ian Lendler, illustrated by Serge Bloch
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 19, 2016

"TGI-Saturday! (Picture book. 5-7)"
A child welcomes the weekend. Read full book review >
THE STRATFORD ZOO MIDNIGHT REVUE PRESENTS <i>ROMEO AND JULIET</i> by Ian Lendler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Bravo! Where so many earnest Shakespeare adaptations flop, this series bids fair to light genuine enthusiasm in young readers. (Graphic fantasy/classic. 8-12) "
The animal thespians at the Stratford Zoo perform yet another of the Bard's tragedies, this time with a rooster and a bear in the title roles. Read full book review >
THE STRATFORD ZOO MIDNIGHT REVUE PRESENTS <i>MACBETH</i> by Ian Lendler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Encore, please! (Graphic fantasy. 8-12)"
Ever wonder what zoo animals do at night? Why, they perform Shakespeare, of course! Read full book review >
AN UNDONE FAIRY TALE by Ian Lendler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

An ordinary fairy tale (pie-baking princess locked in tall tower, knights must perform feats to win her hand from fat stepfather king) is made extraordinary as Ned, the illustrator, and an unnamed narrator attempt to get readers to slow down so they can finish the pictures. Unfortunately, readers are uncooperative. What results is a comedy worthy of Monty Python fans. Sir Wilbur's first task is to slay a dragon . . . but Ned does not have the horses or armor ready, so he must ride a fish and wear a pink tutu—the only props available. One disaster follows another as readers refuse to follow the narrator's directions, differentiated from the text by a font change. In the final showdown the snail-riding princess, who has rescued herself, leads an army of fish-riding, banana-wielding monkeys, the king rides out to greet her with an army of pickles and the beleaguered Ned finally quits. Martin's illustrations are perfect, mixing the two simultaneous tales until their edges are indistinguishable. The spot-on renderings of Ned and the narrator's facial expressions only add to the slapstick. Tremendously clever and hysterically funny. (Picture book. 4-10)Read full book review >