Books by Irene Latham

LOVE, AGNES by Irene Latham
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2018

"Certainly the most engaging of the recent wave of octopus stories, for reading aloud or reading alone. (Informational picture book. 4-7)"
Toward the end of her short life, an octopus exchanges a series of postcards with others around her, including a boy on a pier and her newly hatched eggs. Read full book review >
CAN I TOUCH YOUR HAIR? by Irene Latham
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2018

"A brave and touching portrayal worthy of sharing in classrooms across America. (Picture book/poetry. 8-12)"
A fresh approach to exploring interracial communication. Read full book review >
FRESH DELICIOUS by Irene Latham
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 8, 2016

"Whimsical poems will inspire readers to play with their fruits and vegetables. (Picture book/poetry. 3-8)"
A collection of lively poems celebrate edible delights from the farmers market. Read full book review >
WHEN THE SUN SHINES ON ANTARCTICA by Irene Latham
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2016

"A tender, lively, and mostly thoughtful tour through summer on the frozen continent. (glossary, further reading) (Informational picture book/poetry. 7-12)"
For six months straight, the sun shines in Antarctica, and the ice and oceans are alive with activity. Read full book review >
DEAR WANDERING WILDEBEEST by Irene Latham
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"Enlightening and engaging, a thrilling panorama of the diversity to be found throughout the animal kingdom. (glossary, further reading) (Picture book/poetry. 8-12)"
A poetic celebration of animal life found in the African grasslands. Read full book review >
DON'T FEED THE BOY by Irene Latham
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"Feed this to animal fans. (Fiction. 9-12)"
Raised in the Alabama zoo run by his busy parents, 11-year-old Whit dreams of escape, but his new friend Stella is someone whose need for escape is real. Read full book review >
LEAVING GEE’S BEND by Irene Latham
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2010

"She's taken liberties in depicting real people and events, which is permissible in fiction, but still regrettable when done poorly. (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
In 1932 Gee's Bend, ten-year-old Ludelphia thinks clearest while stitching, so when her mother becomes deathly ill, Ludelphia takes along a quilt top as she crosses the river to get help. Read full book review >