Books by Lee White

KATE, WHO TAMED THE WIND by Liz Garton Scanlon
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 6, 2018

"The story and illustrations strike just the right notes of lightheartedness, determination, and education—on Earth-friendly materials to boot. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A young girl plants saplings around a house on a windy hill in this picture book. Read full book review >
LOVE, SANTA by Martha Brockenbrough
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 26, 2017

"An earnest, emotionally honest effort with lovely illustrations complementing a sweet if sentimental message. (Picture book. 6-9)"
A girl named Lucy writes letters to Santa each Christmas as she comes to understand who Santa really is. Read full book review >
EMMA AND THE WHALE by Julie Case
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 7, 2017

"A well-intentioned effort from a debut author, this does not rise above the plethora of existing tales about whales—beached, biblical, or bellicose. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Emma lives near the sea, where she enjoys beachcombing and playing with her dog, Nemo. Read full book review >
WHAT ARE YOU GLAD ABOUT? WHAT ARE YOU MAD ABOUT? by Judith Viorst
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 9, 2016

"An unusually mixed bag. (Poetry. 6-10)"
The title of Viorst's latest collection of poetry for children provides an open invitation for readers not only to ponder feelings in general, but to examine their reactions to the assembled poems as well. Read full book review >
ARCTIC WHITE by Danna Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 5, 2016

"Despite lovely art, a stereotypically generic and romanticized portrayal of indigenous people. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The Arctic winter is white and gray until something special happens. Read full book review >
THE LOST TRACK OF TIME by Paige Britt
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 31, 2015

"Not as masterful as Juster's genre-defining work but enjoyable on many levels. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
An overscheduled girl falls into a hole in her schedule in Britt's whimsical debut. Read full book review >
THE MAINE COON'S HAIKU by Michael J. Rosen
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 10, 2015

"This perfect poetical paean to pussycats makes both a fine gift for a cat lover and an excellent haiku handbook. (Picture book/poetry. 7-12)"
A kitty companion to The Cuckoo's Haiku (2009) and The Hound Dog's Haiku (2011).Read full book review >
I LIVED ON BUTTERFLY HILL by Marjorie Agosín
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 4, 2014

"Award-winning Chilean author and poet Agosín's debut for young people is a lyrically ambitious tale of exile and reunification. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
With a loving and financially secure family and a close group of friends, 11-year-old Celeste's life in Valparaíso, Chile, is relatively carefree—until the coup that unseats the president and establishes a dictatorship. Read full book review >
SOPHIE'S FISH by A.E. Cannon
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2012

"Visually offbeat and beautiful. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Transfixing artwork shows a boy's imagination running wild on the potential ramifications of pet sitting. Read full book review >
A CRAZY DAY AT THE CRITTER CAFÉ by Barbara Odanaka
ANIMALS
Released: June 9, 2009

Havoc erupts in high-spirited fashion when the animals' bus breaks down outside the local restaurant. In lively rhyme, raccoons lead the boisterous menagerie into the cozy café. Unfortunately for the chef and waiter, manners are lacking as the animals descend en masse. The cow skateboards down the stairs, the elephant band stomps in with tubas and the ostrich squawks for cherry strudel. The waiter's spill sets off a disastrous chain reaction, causing the server to sneeze peas from his nose. When the critters are removed for their shenanigans, the staff rejoices until a dazed bovine emerges from the mess. The rhythmic phrases combine creative wordplay and natural pacing. Changing fonts emphasize the dramatic images. While never cluttered, White's vibrant art conveys the disheveled environment. Muted, colorful backgrounds support the fluid mixed-media characters. Colorful splotches reinforce the sloppy surroundings; messy tables and flying food add amusing details. There are not too many cooks in this kitchen, as high-interest humor creates a rollicking read-aloud. (Picture book. 4-8) Read full book review >
DUCKS DON’T WEAR SOCKS by John Nedwidek
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2008

When Emily, a serious girl, meets Duck, who is definitely not serious and is riding a unicycle and wearing socks, she points out, "Ducks don't wear socks." "Cold feet," yells Duck. On each ensuing day, Emily meets Duck wearing an assortment of unusual items: a cowboy hat as he rides a hobbyhorse, boots (for plowing), a tie and, finally, underwear. As Emily admonishes Duck on his silly apparel, her seriousness fades to giggles, ending in the last spread with Emily sporting a duck costume and the two ducks laughing together. The quirky illustrations play off the absurdity, with Duck's retorts in heavy type. White affects an unusual artistic device with Duck: His dot eye and eyebrow from the usually unseen side of his profile are drawn, seemingly floating in space. This goofy concept will entertain kids as it pokes fun at being too serious. (Picture book. 4-7)Read full book review >
THE HOUSE TAKES A VACATION by Jacqueline Davies
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2007

House moving takes on new meaning in this offbeat tale. When the Petersons leave for a vacation, their house decides to go on holiday too. Each part of the house has his/her own notion of where to go, but they finally agree on seeing the sea. The long trip is arduous, but the dawn of sunlight and the lure of the water provide a thrilling adventure, as the house sets sail and then returns home with a satisfying memory, startling the family with its waterlogged condition. Oil-and-colored pencil illustrations create hazy, molded background scenes that contrast sharply with the bright red house with black stick feet and google-eyed faces on the various parts. The pun-loaded dialogue is really adult humor: The chimney complains, "I feel like I've got the flue," while the bedroom windows creak, "Oh! The pane!" and the roof grumbles, "Man, am I sore. I feel like I've got the shingles." Nevertheless, kids will enjoy the silliness and animated house sections. (Picture book. 4-8)Read full book review >
HUSH LITTLE DIGGER by Ellen Olson-Brown
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: May 1, 2006

Olson-Brown borrows the tune of "Hush Little Baby" and adapts it for the benefit of the automotive-obsessed youngster. Engines rumble to life with, "Hush little digger, don't say a word, / Papa's gonna scoop you a pile of dirt. / And if that dirt starts to overflow, / Papa's gonna find you a red backhoe." There are occasions throughout where the tempo sputters a bit with jittery rhymes or an overabundance of syllables. Still, the ride is made worthy by White's pictures with cartoon vibrancy and nimble, witty tidbits. While father, with his slick, black pompadour, and son frolic in and out of various heavy machinery, the illustrations are popping with details to attract the fancy of youngsters, like ogle-eyed worms, bountiful balls, a dump truck brimming with chickens and various funky creatures. Not as cleverly crafted as Daniel Kirk's Hush Little Alien (1999), but for those children with a vehicle mania, this illustrated lullaby will drive away the blues. (Picture book. 2-5)Read full book review >
STOP THAT NOSE! by Martha Peaslee Levine
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2006

A wayward proboscis takes flight and leads a young boy on a merry chase in this utterly absurd, but amusing nonsense tale. When David's Dad sneezes furiously, his nose blows right off his face "in a hurricane breeze" and runs away. A disconcerted Dad tells David to catch the nose before it blows again. Ignoring David's cries to "stop," the naughty nose keeps running, leading David into a clothesline, through prickly plants, over a truck of chickens, onto the roof of a building and finally into an airplane. Every time the nose sneezes it blows out something amazing—an aardvark, an antelope, an ambulance, an alligator, an ape, an airplane and an athlete—that joins the bizarre chase. The silly verse is accentuated by equally comic oil illustrations that capture every action-packed antic of the acrobatic nose and its ensuing menagerie. This surreal rescue story should tickle tiny noses with lots of giggles and guffaws. (Picture book. 3-8)Read full book review >