Books by Miriam Shlesinger

SUDDENLY, A KNOCK ON THE DOOR by Etgar Keret
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 3, 2012

"More like bits and sketches than stories, from a writer who is often very funny and inventive, and occasionally profound."
Stories about storytelling from a young Israeli author. Read full book review >
THE GIRL ON THE FRIDGE by Etgar Keret
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 24, 2008

"Stein's dilemma is emblematic of Keret's method: The stories read like fragments of reality—personal, political and even metaphysical. It's hard to know how to piece them together."
Forty-six stories in a range of tones and styles, from slapstick to surrealism. Read full book review >
LET IT BE MORNING by Sayed Kashua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 9, 2006

"An accessible and remarkably fair-minded book of particular importance in its immediate relevance. "
This valuable and convincing second novel by Arab-Israeli journalist Kashua (Dancing Arabs, 2004) captures how the Middle East conflict affects a young man of similar background to the novelist's own. Read full book review >
THE NIMROD FLIPOUT by Etgar Keret
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 4, 2006

"A funny and keen chronicler of human foibles, perfecting his craft."
A kaleidoscopic assortment of exact, affecting and richly comic stories from the bestselling Israeli author (The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God, 2001, etc.). Read full book review >
DANCING ARABS by Sayed Kashua
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2004

"Gloomy indeed. And yet this Arab-Israeli newcomer is never once self-indulgent or sentimental, with the result that his story rings out on every page with a compelling sense of human truth."
A quick, readable, highly engaging—and bluntly pessimistic—debut tale of an Arab-Israeli whose life is one of anger, fear, and broken spirit. Read full book review >
THE BUS DRIVER WHO WANTED TO BE GOD by Etgar Keret
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 8, 2001

"Hey, Etgar, don't give up the day job."
A bestselling Israeli author and TV comedy writer draws from previous story collections to introduce himself to an American readership Read full book review >