Books by Paul Hoppe

NEYMAR by Mina Javaherbin
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 29, 2018

"A gem. (Picture book. 5-9)"
From pretend soccer games with family members in his grandfather's house to playing for the Brazilian national soccer team, this is the story of Neymar Jr., one of the world's most valuable players. Read full book review >
LAST-BUT-NOT-LEAST LOLA AND A KNOT THE SIZE OF TEXAS by Christine Pakkala
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"Cheeky Lola is a well-balanced combination of exuberance and naïve vulnerability that charms and entertains. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Hilarious Lola has a lot of problems, but the very biggest one—growing all the time—is the immense knot of snarled hair at the back of her head. What is a girl to do? Read full book review >
LAST-BUT-NOT-LEAST LOLA AND THE WILD CHICKEN by Christine Pakkala
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"While it's nice to have a Jewish chapter-book protagonist, so far Lola is mostly Clementine-lite. (Fiction. 7-11)"
Lola is back in another tale of school and rocky friendship (Last-But-Not-Least Lola Going Green, 2013). Read full book review >
LAST-BUT-NOT-LEAST LOLA GOING GREEN by Christine Pakkala
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"Alas, Lola feels more like a Clementine or Ramona wannabe than a real original. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Second-grader Lola Zuckerman suffers from the indignity of having a last name at the end of the alphabet. Read full book review >
PEANUT by Ayun Halliday
by Ayun Halliday, illustrated by Paul Hoppe
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Jan. 22, 2013

"If readers can suspend some disbelief and simply roll with what's offered, perhaps this will work for them. (Graphic fiction. 12 & up)"
A faked allergy spins wildly out of control in this prosaic graphic novel. Read full book review >
THE WOODS by Paul Hoppe
by Paul Hoppe, illustrated by Paul Hoppe
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2011

The night light is on and the bedtime story firmly in the young narrator's grasp, but stuffed bunny is nowhere to be found! There's only one thing to do: He has to go into the woods, which are conveniently right next to his bedroom. Read full book review >
Released: April 14, 2011

"Teens in the thick of creating identities themselves will find this riveting. (Nonfiction. 12 & up)"
In 10 vignettes, Barton profiles successful imposters, both men and women. Read full book review >
HAT by Paul Hoppe
by Paul Hoppe, illustrated by Paul Hoppe
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2009

When he spies a wide-brimmed red hat on a park bench, Henry wants to keep it. Successive illustrations depict Hat's imagined uses, ranging from the practical (protection from sun and rain) to the fantastic (a wedge in a crocodile's mouth, a prop in a stage show that makes Henry a star). Mom asks, "But Henry, what if someone else needs this hat?" Her question prompts her son to imagine his scenarios in reverse—mirrored depictions, but this time, with other unfortunates suffering the consequences of Hat's absence. An African explorer (who's fairly far along in that croc's digestive process), a magician producing a stinky fish skeleton from a trashcan, a sunburned lifeguard and more—this conjured cast induces Henry to leave Hat behind. Hoppe's watercolor-and-ink pictures invoke such early-reader illustrators as Roy McKie and Lynn Sweat, and the small trim, short sentences and three-color palette (featuring a gorgeous Caps for Sale blue) underscore the retro reader-vibe. A funny, appealing choice for beginning readers, especially boys. (Early reader. 4-6)Read full book review >
METAL MAN by Aaron Reynolds
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2008

It's a hot and sticky city summer day, and Devon knows that metal man Mitch is hard at work. Even though his mama thinks Mitch just makes junk (and needs a real job), Devon finds the acceptance he longs for in Mitch's workshop. "When I hang out with the metal man, I get it right. / I see what I see. / Not like school." Reynolds's free-verse poem overflows with similes, and picture-book readers may find it difficult to follow along, but Hoppe's kinetic mixed-media illustrations have a raw grittiness that well represents the metal man's work. While the characters' faces, when flat or in profile, are not as strong, moments of intense action spring to life. In one image, the forced perspective dynamically captures the metal man as he leans into his work, the energy of the moment bursting forth from the page. Though the story is labored throughout, the succinct and meaningful ending finds Devon realizing that perhaps, underneath all the "crud," something shiny and ferocious lies. (Picture book. 6-8)Read full book review >
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 2006

Hatching an ill-considered scheme to escape financial woes by striking it rich in Las Vegas, preteen best buds—one an extreme jock, the other an equally extreme geek—discover, in this breezy debut, that Vegas is nothing like Walla Walla. With Travis's gift for smooth talk nicely complementing Freddy's ability to hack any security system, making a bundle at the blackjack tables (with some adult help from a friendly cabbie) turns out to be a snap. It's surviving the subsequent pursuit of vicious local kingpin Johnny Large and his thugs Moose and No Neck that turns out to be the real challenge. The authors pack their cast with broadly drawn Vegas caricatures, and a slapstick plot with more implied than actual violence. Though at one point Travis and Freddy find themselves dangling from a 35th-floor window clad only in tighty-whities, and they never do get to keep the cash, they ultimately they walk away winners. Think Mission: Impossible meets Gordon Korman's Son of the Mob (2002), with interwoven family issues providing just the right amount of ballast. (Fiction. 10-12)Read full book review >
THE CURSE OF VAN GOGH by Paul Hoppe
MYSTERY THRILLER

"An inviting, if uneven, story of a modern-day gentleman thief. "
Debut author Hoppe offers a crime thriller about the difficulty of stealing famous art. Read full book review >