Books by Scott Spencer

RIVER UNDER THE ROAD by Scott Spencer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 27, 2017

"Spencer's novel makes some trenchant observations about love and loss, about growing up and growing apart, but in the end, it can't quite get out of its own way."
The story of two couples, recounted across 14 years through the lens of a dozen parties. Read full book review >
MAN IN THE WOODS by Scott Spencer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 2010

"The depth of the characters, the questions they ask and the challenge they confront stay with the reader long after the conclusion."
In one of the richer efforts by the veteran novelist, a compelling setup and stunning conclusion compensate for the thematic navel gazing through the middle. Read full book review >
WILLING by Scott Spencer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 11, 2008

"Against all expectation, considering the subject matter, Jankowsky is a more interesting character than the novel in which he finds himself."
After a strong beginning, this novel about a writer on an international sex tour doesn't show much staying power. Read full book review >
A SHIP MADE OF PAPER by Scott Spencer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 7, 2003

"Subtle without being obscure, a splendidly intricate tragicomedy of manners in the tradition of Saki—full of horrible, delightful, and vivid eccentrics."
From Spencer (The Rich Man's Table, 1998, etc.), a rich and highly textured account of life, love, envy, and disappointment in a Hudson Valley town. Read full book review >
THE RICH MAN'S TABLE by Scott Spencer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 5, 1998

"A mournful, moving work."
"All I wanted was a father," Billy Rothschild explains, looking back at his fatherless childhood. Read full book review >
MEN IN BLACK by Scott Spencer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 16, 1995

"A guilt-drenched walk on well-trod ground."
The guilt of a struggling writer/family man is writ large in the latest from Spencer (Secret Anniversaries, 1990, etc.), but the tired theme doesn't support the fine prose and skillfully rendered characters. Read full book review >