Books by Steven Levy

IN THE PLEX by Steven Levy
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 12, 2011

Dense, driven examination of the pioneering search engine that changed the face of the Internet.

Thoroughly versed in technology reporting, Wired senior writer Levy (The Perfect Thing: How the iPod Shuffles Commerce, Culture, and Coolness, 2006, etc.) deliberates at great length about online behemoth Google and creatively documents the company's genesis from a "feisty start-up to a market-dominating giant." Read full book review >

Released: Oct. 23, 2006

"An infomercial for a popular product."
A tech journalist pens a love letter to "a very special gizmo." Read full book review >
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: Jan. 8, 2001

"Although the welter of personalities and technologies often overwhelms the narrative arc, Levy does a good job of making this important tale readable and comprehensible."
A dramatically rendered if dense account of the post-hippie outsider intellectuals who cracked the National Security Agency's monopoly on cryptography and ushered in much that dot-com America today takes for granted. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

A breezy, anecdotal, yet discerning history of the people, ideas, and technology that led to the user-friendliness of the Macintosh computer. Levy (Artificial Life, 1992, etc.) is among our best interpreters of computer technology (he speaks fluent geek). Read full book review >

ARTIFICIAL LIFE by Steven Levy
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Released: June 15, 1992

Levy again reports from the front lines of technology in this exploration of the history and future of the creation of artificial life—as impressive and illuminating a work as his memorable Hackers (1984). Colonies of light on a computer screen compete, learn, reproduce, and die; ``viruses'' committed to self-preservation adapt to new environments, search computer systems for food, replicate themselves, and destroy; tiny ``bugs'' swarm out of a vacuum cleaner to suck up dirt beneath sofas and carpets, then return to deposit the dirt at home base; a mechanical cockroach sees an object in its path, adjusts its legs to crawl over it, and continues in its explorations. Read full book review >