Though a little on the slight side, these are cozy and familiar experiences for little ones nonetheless.

READ REVIEW

MY DAY

BATHTIME

From the Go, Baby! series

A baby with mocha-colored skin enjoys a romp in the bath.

Nestled in a bright red baby bathtub, a little tyke splashes and pours and plays with boats, toys and bubbles, all while an amused puppy looks on. The art, which looks to be digital collage, is sleek and charming simultaneously, with flat blocks of color, subtle shading and round edges. Two lines of verse grace each page and capture the playful mood. The final page asks, “Where is baby?” and the Mylar mirror embedded into the last page provides the obvious answer. The companion title, My Day: Bedtime, also with a mirror in the back, features a sitting-up, Caucasian baby reading aloud to and tucking in a teddy bear at bedtime. The text here does not scan quite as well, but little ones will have no problem connecting with the familiar scenes. While parents do not appear in any of the spreads in either book, it is clear from the loving tone that they are never too far away.

Though a little on the slight side, these are cozy and familiar experiences for little ones nonetheless. (Board book. 6-18 mos.)

Pub Date: June 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-4083-1502-6

Page Count: 12

Publisher: Orchard UK/Trafalgar

Review Posted Online: June 16, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2013

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A memorable story of kindness, courage and wonder.

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WONDER

After being home-schooled for years, Auggie Pullman is about to start fifth grade, but he’s worried: How will he fit into middle school life when he looks so different from everyone else?

Auggie has had 27 surgeries to correct facial anomalies he was born with, but he still has a face that has earned him such cruel nicknames as Freak, Freddy Krueger, Gross-out and Lizard face. Though “his features look like they’ve been melted, like the drippings on a candle” and he’s used to people averting their eyes when they see him, he’s an engaging boy who feels pretty ordinary inside. He’s smart, funny, kind and brave, but his father says that having Auggie attend Beecher Prep would be like sending “a lamb to the slaughter.” Palacio divides the novel into eight parts, interspersing Auggie’s first-person narrative with the voices of family members and classmates, wisely expanding the story beyond Auggie’s viewpoint and demonstrating that Auggie’s arrival at school doesn’t test only him, it affects everyone in the community. Auggie may be finding his place in the world, but that world must find a way to make room for him, too.

A memorable story of kindness, courage and wonder. (Fiction. 8-14)

Pub Date: Feb. 14, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-375-86902-0

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: Dec. 3, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2011

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It’s encouraging—but not revolutionary in its call for individual grit rather than collective change.

I'M GONNA PUSH THROUGH!

A picture-book encapsulation of the author’s Push Through education movement.

An extensive author’s note explains that Wright came up with the “words and hand movements of the original Push Through mantra” as a teacher endeavoring to explain what “resilient” means. She says she “wanted [her students] to know that their past doesn’t define them, their present doesn’t have to hinder them, and their future is waiting on them.” While readers may find strength in this affirmation, they may also note it seems wholly reliant on individual perseverance rather than systemic change to dismantle oppression. The primary narrative opens with the statement “YOU can push through anything!” while illustrator Wright depicts a young brown-skinned child in profile, hair in beaded braids, and looking determined. The next spread shows the same child with hands over ears against discouraging comments and then smiling and looking out at readers, hands extended to say, “I’m gonna push through!” Ensuing pages show children of different races, genders, and abilities all repeating the “push through” mantra in the face of adversity. Also depicted are diverse famous people (bios in the backmatter) who’ve “pushed through” to meet success, including President Barack Obama, activist LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, and physicist Stephen Hawking.

It’s encouraging—but not revolutionary in its call for individual grit rather than collective change. (Picture book. 5-9)

Pub Date: Feb. 18, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-5344-3965-8

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Atheneum

Review Posted Online: Sept. 29, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2019

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