LE CORDON BLEU AT HOME by Andre Cointreau

LE CORDON BLEU AT HOME

KIRKUS REVIEW

 This ``course'' in French cooking from the well-known Paris cooking school sets out to teach standard cooking techniques, sauces and stocks, and pastry magic in a series of 90 three-course menus that are arranged in three sections: basic, intermediate, and professional. The first 11 lessons (or menus) include boxed comments (not really very detailed) on sautÇing, roasting, mayonnaise, choux pastry, and other basics. ``Technique photo''- strips throughout demonstrate operations from making an omelet to boning a rabbit. By the end of the book, you're into lengthier preparations (the medallion of venison surrounded by tartlets of celeriac and chestnut purÇe is a two-day operation), preparing several terrines in aspic (one seafood, one rabbit) as starters, and serving what seems throughout to be an excessive number of courses in choux pastry shells. (One of these, filled with salmon and asparagus, calls for a total of 36 tablespoons of butter in a recipe for six that's described as a ``light'' dish in the modern style.) The menu arrangement makes the book heavy on pastries and desserts, and there is much butter, eggs, and cream everywhere. The Cordon Bleu name will lend cachet, but this doesn't notably stand out from other major French cooking tomes available, some of them more patiently detailed.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1991
ISBN: 0-688-09750-2
Page count: 592pp
Publisher: Morrow/HarperCollins
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15th, 1991




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