An accessible and appealing invitation to connect with the world of birds.

READ REVIEW

BIRD'S-EYE VIEW

From the Orca Wild series

What are birds, why are they important, why are they in trouble, and what can we do to help them?

Biologist Eriksson, who explored our connections to the ocean in Dive In (2018), here turns to another of her passions, birding. In six nicely organized chapters, she provides both an overview and a close-up look at ways to get involved in learning about birds and supporting them. “Amazing Avians” offers a clear definition of the avian order, even showing its evolutionary connection to dinosaurs. “Winged Wonders” presents some significant bird phenomena such as migration, the dawn chorus, and tool use. “Zooming in on Wild Birds” talks about bird feeding, bird-watching, and citizen science. “Why Wild Birds Matter” explains the importance of birds to the environment as well as to humans. “Beating the Big Bad Three” describes the major reasons bird numbers have declined: habitat loss, invasive species, and climate change. Finally, she invites her readers to help in “Giving Wild Birds a Boost” and reports on group efforts internationally toward “Keeping Wild Birds in Flight.” There are plentiful photographs of both birds and birders of many ages, nationalities, and races; sidebars and small features offering additional information; and full pages devoted to introducing some young birders. With the recent announcement that billions of birds have disappeared from North American skies in the past 50 years, this is a particularly timely title.

An accessible and appealing invitation to connect with the world of birds. (glossary, resource, index) (Nonfiction. 9-14)

Pub Date: May 12, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-4598-2153-8

Page Count: 144

Publisher: Orca

Review Posted Online: Feb. 9, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

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The photos effectively convey the scope of Harvey’s impact, but while journalistically sound, this informative book doesn’t...

HURRICANE HARVEY

DISASTER IN TEXAS AND BEYOND

The devastation of 2017’s Hurricane Harvey is explained, from the storm’s origin to its ongoing aftermath, in this photo-heavy book.

In retelling the story of how a storm got so big it caused 82 deaths and billions of dollars in damage along the Texas coast, Minneapolis-based author Felix details the science of hurricanes for those unfamiliar and unpacks why this and a series of other hurricanes made for one of the most damaging weather years on record. Although it’s packed with info-boxes, a glossary, tips for safety during a hurricane and helping survivors afterward, a snapshot of five other historic hurricanes, and well-curated photos, it misses an opportunity to convey some of the emotion and pain victims endured and continue to feel. Instead, much of the text feels like a summation of news reports, an efficient attempt to answer the whys of Hurricane Harvey, with only a few direct quotations. Readers learn about Virgil Smith, a Dickinson, Texas, teen who rescued others from floodwaters with an air mattress, but the information is secondhand. The book does answer, clearly and concisely, questions a kid might have about a hurricane, such as what happens to animals at the zoo in such an emergency and how a tropical storm forms in the first place. A portion of the book’s proceeds are to be donated to the Texas Library Association’s Disaster Relief Fund.

The photos effectively convey the scope of Harvey’s impact, but while journalistically sound, this informative book doesn’t capture the fear and shock those who lived through the hurricane must have felt. (Nonfiction. 9-10)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5415-2888-8

Page Count: 36

Publisher: Millbrook/Lerner

Review Posted Online: March 19, 2018

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An interesting, engaging collection of snapshot profiles that will encourage readers to explore further and perhaps pursue...

TRAILBLAZERS

33 WOMEN IN SCIENCE WHO CHANGED THE WORLD

With STEM now the hot trend in education and concerted efforts to encourage girls to explore scientific fields, this collective biography is most timely.

Swaby offers 33 brief profiles of some of the world’s most influential women in science, organized in loose groupings: technology and innovation, earth and stars, health and medicine, and biology. Some of the figures, such as Mary Anning, Rachel Carson, Florence Nightingale, Sally Ride, and Marie Tharp, have been written about for young readers, but most have not. Among the lesser known are Stephanie Kwolek, the American chemist who invented Kevlar; Yvonne Brill, the Canadian engineer who invented a thruster used in satellites; Elsie Widdowson, the British nutritionist who demonstrated how important fluid and salt are for the body to properly function; and Italian neuroembryologist Rita Levi-Montalcini, who made breakthrough discoveries in nerve-cell growth. Swaby emphasizes that most of these scientists had to overcome great obstacles before achieving their successes and receiving recognition due to gender-based discrimination. She also notes that people are not born brilliant scientists and that it’s through repeated observation, experimentation, and testing of ideas that important discoveries are made.

An interesting, engaging collection of snapshot profiles that will encourage readers to explore further and perhaps pursue their own scientific curiosities. (source notes, bibliography) (Collective biography. 10-14)

Pub Date: Sept. 13, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-399-55396-7

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Delacorte

Review Posted Online: July 20, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2016

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