Perfect for those who enjoy their ghost stories laced with a dose of humor.

THE THRILLING ADVENTURE HOUR

A SPIRITED ROMANCE

A lighthearted adventure involving a suave, ghost-fighting couple, a good dose of ghost psychology and know-how, and plenty of cocktails.

Based on a popular stage production and podcast performed live for over 10 years in the style of old-time radio, this collected edition of several episodes transitions effortlessly into comic-book format. The tone is set by the warning found at the beginning of the book “WARNING: This volume contains two-fisted action, full-hearted romance and spine-tingling terror. Sometimes concurrently. PLEASE READ RESPONSIBLY.” Indeed, sometimes the two-fisted action can involve dealing with a monster by chopping off its head, but more often by understanding the ghost and giving it a stern talking to. The fearless couple, Frank and Sadie Doyle, are somewhat reminiscent of Morticia and Gomez Addams. The artwork is vibrant—the palette rich in deep blues and purple—the action is spirited, and the conversation comedic in its intensity. Not to be overlooked is the behind-the-scenes material at the end of the book, with notes and commentary from the authors in which they detail how they envision the transition from script to graphic novel.

Perfect for those who enjoy their ghost stories laced with a dose of humor. (Graphic fiction. 12-18)

Pub Date: Oct. 16, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-68415-231-5

Page Count: 112

Publisher: BOOM! Studios

Review Posted Online: Nov. 25, 2018

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THE MERCHANT OF VENICE

Of late, there have been many unsuccessful attempts to adapt Shakespeare into the graphic-novel format; Hinds’s beautiful new offering now sets the standard that all others will strive to meet. Presenting readers with deftly drawn characters (based on live models) and easily read dialogue that modulates over the course of the work from adapted prose to the original Shakespeare, he re-works the classic Shakespeare play of deception, greed and revenge. Though located in a modern setting, readers will easily follow the premise and find themselves lost in the intricately lovely Venetian backdrop. While this adaptation may leave purists sniffing at the omission of entire scenes and characters, Hinds carefully explains to his readers in a note why and how he made those choices. A deceptively simple graphic novel on the surface, this volume begs for multiple readings on a closer level, at the same time acting as a wonderful introduction to the original. Easily on a par with his stellar adaptation of Beowulf (2007), it’s a captivating, smartly executed work. (Graphic novel. 12+)

Pub Date: May 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-7636-3024-9

Page Count: 80

Publisher: Candlewick

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2008

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A not-very-illuminating updating of Chaucer’s Tales.

THE CANTERBURY TALES

A RETELLING

Continuing his apparent mission to refract the whole of English culture and history through his personal lens, Ackroyd (Thames: The Biography, 2008, etc.) offers an all-prose rendering of Chaucer’s mixed-media masterpiece.

While Burton Raffel’s modern English version of The Canterbury Tales (2008) was unabridged, Ackroyd omits both “The Tale of Melibee” and “The Parson’s Tale” on the undoubtedly correct assumption that these “standard narratives of pious exposition” hold little interest for contemporary readers. Dialing down the piety, the author dials up the raunch, freely tossing about the F-bomb and Anglo-Saxon words for various body parts that Chaucer prudently described in Latin. Since “The Wife of Bath’s Tale” and “The Miller’s Tale,” for example, are both decidedly earthy in Middle English, the interpolated obscenities seem unnecessary as well as jarringly anachronistic. And it’s anyone’s guess why Ackroyd feels obliged redundantly to include the original titles (“Here bigynneth the Squieres Tales,” etc.) directly underneath the new ones (“The Squires Tale,” etc.); these one-line blasts of antique spelling and diction remind us what we’re missing without adding anything in the way of comprehension. The author’s other peculiar choice is to occasionally interject first-person comments by the narrator where none exist in the original, such as, “He asked me about myself then—where I had come from, where I had been—but I quickly turned the conversation to another course.” There seems to be no reason for these arbitrary elaborations, which muffle the impact of those rare times in the original when Chaucer directly addresses the reader. Such quibbles would perhaps be unfair if Ackroyd were retelling some obscure gem of Old English, but they loom larger with Chaucer because there are many modern versions of The Canterbury Tales. Raffel’s rendering captured a lot more of the poetry, while doing as good a job as Ackroyd with the vigorous prose.

A not-very-illuminating updating of Chaucer’s Tales.

Pub Date: Nov. 16, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-670-02122-2

Page Count: 436

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2009

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