THE WIND AND THE EAGLE

Modern man Miles Drake transcends time and space to arrive in the medieval world of the Vikings in Horsley’s debut fantasy novel.

Horsley ventures into dangerously shopworn territory: a modern protagonist travels in time back to the era of the Vikings. But the author’s cerebral approach is neither that of a standard teen action-adventure nor a derivative paranormal romance. Multiple narrative points of view and a strong grip on alternative cultural values flavor the saga of Miles, who, until recently, has led a charmed life as a champion college athlete and successful businessman. But as he’s still reeling from the deaths of both his wife and his best friend, Miles is approached by a stranger and asked to carry out a ritual with an ancient heirloom. Abruptly he finds himself in a medieval Norse cosmos, in which he alone can approach the World Tree for healing and answers. Miles is a skeptic of the Vikings’ faith, despite the fact that his new Icelandic friends interpret him as the gods’ own instrument. He adapts with surprising ease to routine raiding and casual killing, introducing his Viking brethren to modified weapons and fighting styles. He also campaigns for chivalry toward women and the helpless, and the colonization of the great North American landmass to the west. Horsley’s storytelling frequently shifts from Miles to those around him as the timeline doubles back and flashes forward with many twists and turns. This method of narration is less burdensome to read than one might imagine, but still eccentric. The author’s most considerable achievement, besides his diverting if tangled yarn-spinning, is illuminating a much misunderstood “barbarian” mindset. Horsley depicts Viking culture with depth and nuance, adding layer to a people who pragmatically accept violence, treachery, death and the will of potentially harsh gods as a predestined way of life. A virile immersion in traditional Viking values. 

 

Pub Date: Dec. 23, 2011

ISBN: 978-1462071654

Page Count: 396

Publisher: iUniverse

Review Posted Online: May 11, 2012

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A tasty, if not always tasteful, tale of supernatural mayhem that fans of King and Crichton alike will enjoy.

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  • New York Times Bestseller

DEVOLUTION

Are we not men? We are—well, ask Bigfoot, as Brooks does in this delightful yarn, following on his bestseller World War Z (2006).

A zombie apocalypse is one thing. A volcanic eruption is quite another, for, as the journalist who does a framing voice-over narration for Brooks’ latest puts it, when Mount Rainier popped its cork, “it was the psychological aspect, the hyperbole-fueled hysteria that had ended up killing the most people.” Maybe, but the sasquatches whom the volcano displaced contributed to the statistics, too, if only out of self-defense. Brooks places the epicenter of the Bigfoot war in a high-tech hideaway populated by the kind of people you might find in a Jurassic Park franchise: the schmo who doesn’t know how to do much of anything but tries anyway, the well-intentioned bleeding heart, the know-it-all intellectual who turns out to know the wrong things, the immigrant with a tough backstory and an instinct for survival. Indeed, the novel does double duty as a survival manual, packed full of good advice—for instance, try not to get wounded, for “injury turns you from a giver to a taker. Taking up our resources, our time to care for you.” Brooks presents a case for making room for Bigfoot in the world while peppering his narrative with timely social criticism about bad behavior on the human side of the conflict: The explosion of Rainier might have been better forecast had the president not slashed the budget of the U.S. Geological Survey, leading to “immediate suspension of the National Volcano Early Warning System,” and there’s always someone around looking to monetize the natural disaster and the sasquatch-y onslaught that follows. Brooks is a pro at building suspense even if it plays out in some rather spectacularly yucky episodes, one involving a short spear that takes its name from “the sucking sound of pulling it out of the dead man’s heart and lungs.” Grossness aside, it puts you right there on the scene.

A tasty, if not always tasteful, tale of supernatural mayhem that fans of King and Crichton alike will enjoy.

Pub Date: June 16, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9848-2678-7

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Del Rey/Ballantine

Review Posted Online: Feb. 10, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2020

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The best-selling author of tearjerkers like Angel Falls (2000) serves up yet another mountain of mush, topped off with...

SUMMER ISLAND

Talk-show queen takes tumble as millions jeer.

Nora Bridges is a wildly popular radio spokesperson for family-first virtues, but her loyal listeners don't know that she walked out on her husband and teenaged daughters years ago and didn't look back. Now that a former lover has sold racy pix of naked Nora and horny himself to a national tabloid, her estranged daughter Ruby, an unsuccessful stand-up comic in Los Angeles, has been approached to pen a tell-all. Greedy for the fat fee she's been promised, Ruby agrees and heads for the San Juan Islands, eager to get reacquainted with the mom she plans to betray. Once in the family homestead, nasty Ruby alternately sulks and glares at her mother, who is temporarily wheelchair-bound as a result of a post-scandal car crash. Uncaring, Ruby begins writing her side of the story when she's not strolling on the beach with former sweetheart Dean Sloan, the son of wealthy socialites who basically ignored him and his gay brother Eric. Eric, now dying of cancer and also in a wheelchair, has returned to the island. This dismal threesome catch up on old times, recalling their childhood idylls on the island. After Ruby's perfect big sister Caroline shows up, there's another round of heartfelt talk. Nora gradually reveals the truth about her unloving husband and her late father's alcoholism, which led her to seek the approval of others at the cost of her own peace of mind. And so on. Ruby is aghast to discover that she doesn't know everything after all, but Dean offers her subdued comfort. Happy endings await almost everyone—except for readers of this nobly preachy snifflefest.

The best-selling author of tearjerkers like Angel Falls (2000) serves up yet another mountain of mush, topped off with syrupy platitudes about life and love.

Pub Date: March 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-609-60737-5

Page Count: 336

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2001

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