For kids who are passionate about effecting change and for those who aren’t aware of their potential impact, this book is a...

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YOU ARE MIGHTY

A GUIDE TO CHANGING THE WORLD

The author of The Gutsy Girl (2016, illustrated by Wendy MacNaughton) addresses young would-be activists in this how-to manual for effecting change in the world.

Paul opens her book with a letter addressed to young readers in which she connects children’s determination to stand up for their personal likes and dislikes to their power to change the world. She then lists 18 actions people of all ages can take to stand up for causes they believe in, from the small (“Change Your Habits,” “Make a Protest Sign,” “Petition,” “Volunteer,” “Raise Money,” “Write a Letter”) to the large (“Perform Guerilla Theater,” “Invent Something,” “Take Them to Court,” “March,” “Walk Out,” “Just Sit Down”). Each section features true stories of people as young as 6 who took these actions on issues they cared about and had their voices heard. Each section also includes a “workbook” section, with a list of steps to take in order to complete the action. Interspersed throughout are “Activist Tips” that explain terms such as “escalate,” “privilege,” “intersectionality” and “direct action.” Paul makes a point of encouraging people with privilege to take the stance of an ally rather than speaking for disadvantaged groups. She also cautions readers to understand the potential repercussions of direct action, “especially if you are a kid of color.” As clear and responsible as the author is, young readers may still need adult guidance to understand how these sections apply to their lives. Tamaki’s loose black-and-white illustrations include children of many races and at least one woman wearing a hijab.

For kids who are passionate about effecting change and for those who aren’t aware of their potential impact, this book is a useful guide for brainstorming and inspiration. (further reading) (Nonfiction. 9-13)

Pub Date: May 15, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-68119-822-4

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Review Posted Online: March 4, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2018

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The photos effectively convey the scope of Harvey’s impact, but while journalistically sound, this informative book doesn’t...

HURRICANE HARVEY

DISASTER IN TEXAS AND BEYOND

The devastation of 2017’s Hurricane Harvey is explained, from the storm’s origin to its ongoing aftermath, in this photo-heavy book.

In retelling the story of how a storm got so big it caused 82 deaths and billions of dollars in damage along the Texas coast, Minneapolis-based author Felix details the science of hurricanes for those unfamiliar and unpacks why this and a series of other hurricanes made for one of the most damaging weather years on record. Although it’s packed with info-boxes, a glossary, tips for safety during a hurricane and helping survivors afterward, a snapshot of five other historic hurricanes, and well-curated photos, it misses an opportunity to convey some of the emotion and pain victims endured and continue to feel. Instead, much of the text feels like a summation of news reports, an efficient attempt to answer the whys of Hurricane Harvey, with only a few direct quotations. Readers learn about Virgil Smith, a Dickinson, Texas, teen who rescued others from floodwaters with an air mattress, but the information is secondhand. The book does answer, clearly and concisely, questions a kid might have about a hurricane, such as what happens to animals at the zoo in such an emergency and how a tropical storm forms in the first place. A portion of the book’s proceeds are to be donated to the Texas Library Association’s Disaster Relief Fund.

The photos effectively convey the scope of Harvey’s impact, but while journalistically sound, this informative book doesn’t capture the fear and shock those who lived through the hurricane must have felt. (Nonfiction. 9-10)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5415-2888-8

Page Count: 36

Publisher: Millbrook/Lerner

Review Posted Online: March 19, 2018

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The car gets shortchanged, but comparing the divergent career paths of its (putative) two riders may give readers food for...

TWO MEN AND A CAR

FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT, AL CAPONE, AND A CADILLAC V-8

A custom-built, bulletproof limo links two historical figures who were pre-eminent in more or less different spheres.

Garland admits that a claim that FDR was driven to Congress to deliver his “Day of Infamy” speech in a car that once belonged to Capone rests on shaky evidence. He nonetheless uses the anecdote as a launchpad for twin portraits of contemporaries who occupy unique niches in this country’s history but had little in common. Both were smart, ambitious New Yorkers and were young when their fathers died, but they definitely “headed in opposite directions.” As he fills his biographical sketches with standard-issue facts and has disappointingly little to say about the car itself (which was commissioned by Capone in 1928 and still survives), this outing seems largely intended to be a vehicle for the dark, heavy illustrations. These are done in muted hues with densely scratched surfaces and angled so that the two men, the period backgrounds against which they are posed, and the car have monumental looks. It’s a reach to bill this, as the author does, a “story about America,” but it does at least offer a study in contrasts featuring two of America’s most renowned citizens. Most of the human figures are white in the art, but some group scenes include a few with darker skin.

The car gets shortchanged, but comparing the divergent career paths of its (putative) two riders may give readers food for thought. (timeline, bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 10-12)

Pub Date: March 12, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-88448-620-6

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Tilbury House

Review Posted Online: Jan. 15, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2019

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