THE LOUDS MOVE IN!

A new family shatters the hushed tranquility on Earmuffle Avenue in this sonic counterpart to Sam Swope’s neglected classic The Araboolies of Liberty Street (1989). Cowering in their homes while the Louds crash about and bellow in CAPITAL LETTERS—“WILL SOMEONE PLEASE ANSWER THE PHONE? WHO TOOK THE REMOTE, FOR PETE’S SAKE? THE BABY’S EATING THE CAT’S FOOD. WAAAAH!”—neighbors Miss Shushermush, Mr. Pitterpatter and Miss Meekerton at last nerve themselves to lodge a complaint. But before they can, the Louds’ house goes suddenly silent. Dunnick adds hand-lettered sound effects to crank the volume of his cartoon scenes, all of which feature pop-eyed, open-mouthed figures set in a well-kept suburban cul-de-sac, up even further. The lifestyle conflict ends, as in Arthur Howard’s Hubbub Above (2005) and other takes on the premise, with reconciliation; the neighbors discover that they miss the noise, and so gladly join the returning Louds (who had been on a vacation) in a pizza party and a communal closing belch. A sound effort. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: March 1, 2006

ISBN: 0-7614-5221-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Marshall Cavendish

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 2006

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THE GIRL WHO LOVED WILD HORSES

            There are many parallel legends – the seal women, for example, with their strange sad longings – but none is more direct than this American Indian story of a girl who is carried away in a horses’ stampede…to ride thenceforth by the side of a beautiful stallion who leads the wild horses.  The girl had always loved horses, and seemed to understand them “in a special way”; a year after her disappearance her people find her riding beside the stallion, calf in tow, and take her home despite his strong resistance.  But she is unhappy and returns to the stallion; after that, a beautiful mare is seen riding always beside him.  Goble tells the story soberly, allowing it to settle, to find its own level.  The illustrations are in the familiar striking Goble style, but softened out here and there with masses of flowers and foliage – suitable perhaps for the switch in subject matter from war to love, but we miss the spanking clean design of Custer’s Last Battle and The Fetterman Fight.          6-7

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 1978

ISBN: 0689845049

Page Count: -

Publisher: Bradbury

Review Posted Online: April 26, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1978

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IGGY PECK, ARCHITECT

A repressive teacher almost ruins second grade for a prodigy in this amusing, if overwritten, tale. Having shown a fascination with great buildings since constructing a model of the Leaning Tower of Pisa from used diapers at age two, Iggy sinks into boredom after Miss Greer announces, throwing an armload of histories and craft projects into the trash, that architecture will be a taboo subject in her class. Happily, she changes her views when the collapse of a footbridge leaves the picnicking class stranded on an island, whereupon Iggy enlists his mates to build a suspension bridge from string, rulers and fruit roll-ups. Familiar buildings and other structures, made with unusual materials or, on the closing pages, drawn on graph paper, decorate Roberts’s faintly retro cartoon illustrations. They add an audience-broadening element of sophistication—as would Beaty’s decision to cast the text into verse, if it did not result in such lines as “After twelve long days / that passed in a haze / of reading, writing and arithmetic, / Miss Greer took the class / to Blue River Pass / for a hike and an old-fashioned picnic.” Another John Lithgow she is not, nor is Iggy another Remarkable Farkle McBride (2000), but it’s always salutary to see young talent vindicated. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2007

ISBN: 978-0-8109-1106-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Abrams

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2007

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