This proactive princess will captivate readers with her charmingly unconventional tale.

READ REVIEW

PRINCESS PATTY MEETS HER MATCH

When her Prince Charming fails to materialize, Princess Patty takes matters into her own hands.

Weary waiting for her prince to come, Princess Patty dons her “favorite comfy shoes” and “super-sparkly knapsack” and begins the quest to find her prince. She rejects a prince who offers a glass slipper and tries to yank off her shoe. She rejects a foolish prince who thinks he’s fighting dragons by snaring dragonflies in a net. She’s not interested in a prince who wants to wake her with a kiss, as she’s already awake, and he has chapped lips. She avoids a prince stashing peas under a stack of mattresses and opts not to kiss a potential frog prince. Even the fairy godmother she meets is too confused to help her. Discouraged by the pool of princes, Princess Patty returns to her castle, where she finally finds her perfect match. Simple, childlike illustrations rely on pastel hues, precise lines and decorative patterns to create a fairy-tale innocence, tracking Princess Patty’s quest across a landscape of stylized castles, hills, flowers and trees. Wearing high-top sneakers, a flowered tunic and sparkly backpack, Princess Patty resembles a savvy contemporary girl who knows what she wants far better than the traditional fairy-tale princess.

This proactive princess will captivate readers with her charmingly unconventional tale. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Dec. 9, 2014

ISBN: 978-142310804-7

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Review Posted Online: Sept. 14, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2014

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Nevertheless, children will enjoy the whimsical scenes, and adult mavens of children’s literature will appreciate and...

GOODNIGHT SONGS

ILLUSTRATED BY TWELVE AWARD-WINNING PICTURE BOOK ARTISTS

It’s a treasure trove: one dozen previously unpublished lyrical songs illustrated by the likes of Jonathan Bean, Carin Berger and Melissa Sweet.

In an introduction, estate editor Amy Gary explains how she found a trunk in Brown’s sister’s barn filled with unpublished manuscripts with Brown’s handwritten notes along with musical scores of her words. They were written in 1952, the last year of her life, when she was traveling in France for a book tour and under contract to create songs for a new children’s record company. Brown’s intent was to capture the spirit of a child’s world in her songs as she had done with her stories. As the opening to “The Secret Song” demonstrates, the simple rhymes have Brown’s trademark charm: “Who saw the petals / Drop from the rose? / ‘I,’ said the spider. / ‘But nobody knows.’ / Who saw the sunset / Flash on a bird? / ‘I,’ said the fish. / ‘But nobody heard.’ ” Each song is presented on one double-page spread, each illustrated by a different artist (uncredited until an ending recap), in a rather staid book design that does not rise to meet the buoyancy of the lyrics.

Nevertheless, children will enjoy the whimsical scenes, and adult mavens of children’s literature will appreciate and delight in the background of the discovery. (CD) (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: March 4, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-4549-0446-5

Page Count: 28

Publisher: Sterling

Review Posted Online: Jan. 22, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2014

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MOTHER GOOSE PICTURE PUZZLES

Hillenbrand introduces the idea of rebuses to newly emergent readers with a gathering of likely-to-be-familiar Mother Goose rhymes—from “Hey diddle, diddle, / the [cat] and the [fiddle]” to “Twinkle, twinkle, little [star].” To make the translations ultra-easy, he provides literal visual interpretations for each rhyme in good-humored cartoon scenes featuring smiling people or animals, generally in country dress and settings. (He moderates verisimilitude for the audience appropriately: Jill’s fallen male companion and Humpty Dumpty are unhappy after their accidents but plainly not grievously injured.) He even labels the relevant figures, all of whom or which are larger versions of the rebuses: “cake,” “baker’s man” and “baby,” for instance, or “hill,” “pail,” “water” and “crown (another word for top of head).” As a technique for promoting visual and verbal literacy at once this game has a good track record, and young audiences put off by the crudely illustrated likes of Blanche Fisher Wright’s Real Mother Goose Picture Word Rhymes (1916, 1987) or the much older Mother Goose in Hieroglyphics (1849, 1973) will both enjoy and benefit from this shorter but more child-friendly outing. (Nursery rhymes. 3-5)

Pub Date: March 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-0-7614-5808-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Marshall Cavendish

Review Posted Online: Jan. 26, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2011

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