FALLING ANGELS

A gentle fantasy about seeing with your heart as well as your eyes. Sally could always fly, and although her mother doesn’t believe it, her grandmother knows it to be true. As her grandmother is confined to bed, Sally brings her orchids from Africa, a shell from Patagonia, even snow from “where no one had ever walked.” Finally her grandmother flies with her, to her favorite place, where she takes her last breath. Sally never stops flying even when she grows up, and she flies with her children and grandchildren, too. The metaphor of imagination is tethered to Thompson’s (Future Eden, not reviewed, etc.) intricately detailed, dreamy illustrations: here’s a house with an airplane in the yard; there’s one sandwiched next to a clearly inhabited domicile-sized shoe. There’s a page of wondrous doors, and several of small boxes that might hold a gargoyle or a pair of red shoes. Beds sprout wings and roots and lakes lap gently at the edge of the bureau. The story works on several levels, but it is the fascinating pictures that will have young readers and listeners asking to see it again and again. (Picture book. 5-9)

Pub Date: Sept. 15, 2001

ISBN: 0-09-176817-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Hutchinson/Trafalgar

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2001

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IGGY PECK, ARCHITECT

A repressive teacher almost ruins second grade for a prodigy in this amusing, if overwritten, tale. Having shown a fascination with great buildings since constructing a model of the Leaning Tower of Pisa from used diapers at age two, Iggy sinks into boredom after Miss Greer announces, throwing an armload of histories and craft projects into the trash, that architecture will be a taboo subject in her class. Happily, she changes her views when the collapse of a footbridge leaves the picnicking class stranded on an island, whereupon Iggy enlists his mates to build a suspension bridge from string, rulers and fruit roll-ups. Familiar buildings and other structures, made with unusual materials or, on the closing pages, drawn on graph paper, decorate Roberts’s faintly retro cartoon illustrations. They add an audience-broadening element of sophistication—as would Beaty’s decision to cast the text into verse, if it did not result in such lines as “After twelve long days / that passed in a haze / of reading, writing and arithmetic, / Miss Greer took the class / to Blue River Pass / for a hike and an old-fashioned picnic.” Another John Lithgow she is not, nor is Iggy another Remarkable Farkle McBride (2000), but it’s always salutary to see young talent vindicated. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2007

ISBN: 978-0-8109-1106-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Abrams

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2007

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DOG HEAVEN

Rylant's debut as a picture book illustrator (not to be confused with her board book debut as a collagist in The Everyday Books, 1993) offers sweet comfort to all who have lost loved ones, pets or otherwise. ``When dogs go to Heaven, they don't need wings because God knows that dogs love running best. He gives them fields. Fields and fields and fields.'' There are geese to bark at, plenty of children, biscuits, and, for those that need them, homes. In page- filling acrylics, small, simply brushed figures float against huge areas of bright colors: pictures infused with simple, doggy joy. At the end, an old man leans on a cane as he walks up a slope toward a small white dog: ``Dogs in Dog Heaven may stay as long as they like. . . .They will be there when old friends show up. They will be there at the door.'' Pure, tender, lyrical without being overearnest, and deeply felt. (Picture book. 5-9)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1995

ISBN: 0-590-41701-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Blue Sky/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1995

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