TILL WE HAVE FACES by C.S. Lewis

TILL WE HAVE FACES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The story of Cupid and Psyche, reset in the frame of the primitive kingdom of Glome, sacrifices the King's youngest daughter Istra to Ungit (Aphrodite) and brings Orual, his oldest, ugly daughter, to consider the unknown ways of love. For Istra's sacrifice has made her the beloved of the god whom she never sees, lodged her in a castle no one else can see, and Orual, despised by their father and despising their other sister, through her love, selfish and tormenting, for Istra is the means of tearing Istra from the world she has achieved to wander the earth. Orual, veiled and well taught by the Greek Fox and the warrior Bardia, inherits Glome, prevails in war and peace, learns the bitter lessons of love not given and receives the mystery and vision of Istra's joyous belief and her own part in the story before her death. Told by Orual, this brings into play a certain psychological explanation of Glome's primitive customs, life and social behavior and, in its complaint to the gods who have so jealously pursued her, offers a document that allies a Christian paralleling of the good and evil in the old myth, and makes of the ugly sister a seeker to whom the truth is gradually revealed. Interesting- fascinating in its recreation of Glome -- and with an appeal for those curious about the spiritual interpretations and religious allegories found in his earlier books.
Pub Date: Jan. 9th, 1956
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1st, 1956




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