Old-fashioned nostalgia—a natural for grandparents who would like to share their Yiddish with their kinder.

YIDDISH SAVES THE DAY

Toss some Yiddish words into your everyday conversation and all will be well.

In singsong rhyming couplets, the author encourages readers not to fret (“Oy vey!”) over everyday “tsuris,” because a sampling of Yiddish words will bring “mazel.” The protagonist’s teacher has asked the “kinder” to compile a list of words “that show spirit,” and the child is distressed at having lost the notebook with the words to study. The whole “mishpocha”—parents, aunts, uncles, cousins, etc.—reassures him as they “schmooze.” Over dinner that evening with the mishpocha, the child eats like a “chazzer,” piling the plate with a “knaidel,” a “kugel,” and a “knish”—to the point of “plotzing.” “Feh!” The child’s tummy may be in bad shape, but the resultant list of words is long—“like jewels in a vault!” Happiness is achieved! The Yiddish words incorporated into the verse are capitalized in boldface type, and at the bottom of the page a decorative box provides an English pronunciation and a translation. Borlasca’s illustrations, using digital tools, pencil, and acrylic paint, depict an early-20th-century urban setting and family, all of whom are round-faced and white.

Old-fashioned nostalgia—a natural for grandparents who would like to share their Yiddish with their kinder. (note for families) (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-68115-544-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Apples & Honey Press

Review Posted Online: May 8, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2019

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Though it’s fairly unoriginal at its core, this story’s charismatic star will have appeal in dog-loving households.

LATKE, THE LUCKY DOG

A rescued dog chosen as a Hanukkah present at an animal shelter relates his good luck as he learns to adapt to his new family and home.

Zoe and Zach welcome their new pet, a playful, medium-sized, golden-brown dog, and name him Latke (he’s exactly the color of one). The newest member of the family assumes all the celebratory aspects of the eight-day Hanukkah holiday are just for him and innocently creates a mild disturbance on each night. Latke eats the sufganiyot and latkes, rips open presents, chews up the dreidels and candles, slobbers all over the chocolate gelt and knocks the bowl of applesauce over. With each mishap, Zoe and Zach find a way to forgive, letting the curious new dog know he is very fortunate indeed. Ever remorseful, Latke finally accepts his own gift of a chew toy and understands he is one lucky dog to be part of a great family. Latke relates his own story, folding his innocent misdeeds into the basic structure of the eight nights of remembrance. Simple, childlike gouache scenes favor the star of the story, a sweet and personable mutt sporting floppy black ears against a brown happy face. He has rather more personality than the overall presentation, which cannot shed its inherent didacticism.

Though it’s fairly unoriginal at its core, this story’s charismatic star will have appeal in dog-loving households. (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-7613-9038-1

Page Count: 24

Publisher: Kar-Ben

Review Posted Online: July 1, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2014

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In the end too much is left unanswered, making this book pleasant but only passable

PIPPA'S PASSOVER PLATE

A mouse searches for and finally finds her missing Seder plate.

Pippa is an industrious house-cleaning mouse. And no wonder—Passover is starting this very evening. Dusting and sweeping finished, she turns her attention to setting the table as a pot of chicken stew bubbles away on the stovetop. But there is one very important object that is missing: the “special Seder plate.” Frantically, the mouse searches through boxes and cupboards and finally ventures into the yard. First she encounters a very large cat and asks if it has seen the plate. “No,” answers the cat and points her to a snake, who sends her to an owl, who directs her to Golda Fish, prettily swimming in the water. Success! Kirkfield’s little tale is written in rhyming couplets with much repetition of “QUIVER! QUAVER! SHIVER! SHAKE!” for emphasis with each interaction with a predator, so readers will be mightily puzzled when the formerly frightful critters join Pippa at the holiday table. Weber’s gouache, crayon, and collage illustrations are sweetly pretty. The final illustration features a Seder plate with transliterated Hebrew and an English translation of the components. Readers familiar with the holiday may find this mildly enjoyable, but others will likely want and need more information.

In the end too much is left unanswered, making this book pleasant but only passable . (Picture book. 3-5)

Pub Date: Feb. 12, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-8234-4162-4

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Holiday House

Review Posted Online: Nov. 12, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2019

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