THE CAREY STREET CAT

Jenkins, a cat, gets along happily on Carey Street once Harry has pointed out to the neighbors who object to Jenkins's wandering from house to house that the cat's life is not so different from Harry's: he splits the week between his divorced parents. But when Jenkins captures a bit of a star (not a whole one, just ``a little-bit-of-Dazzle''), the people are affronted- -Dazzle is too bright, too scary, and certainly unprecedented. Harry's mom sums it up: ``That cat is just like your father. He's after the impossible.'' Outrage soon gives way to media furor and fame, during which everyone forgets to feed the poor cat. But Harry's dad, an artist, understands that Jenkins's magic is real- -he just ``got a bit carried away.'' Together, he and Harry find a unique way to set things right by saving the cat from his extraordinary find, knowing that next time Jenkins will be careful not to jump so high. This satirical fable is told with good humor, in language simple enough for younger children to enjoy aloud or read for themselves; Wickstrom's frequent b&w illustrations nicely reflect the mellow, comical tone. This team's The Rainbow Watchers, published simultaneously in the same format, also considers fitting in and the meaning of art, but the storyline is not as strong. (Fiction. 6-10)

Pub Date: Oct. 16, 1991

ISBN: 0-688-10298-1

Page Count: 48

Publisher: N/A

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1991

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ELIZABETI'S DOLL

Charmed by her new baby brother, Elizabeti decides that she wants a baby of her own; she picks up a smooth rock, names it Eva and washes, feeds, and changes her, and carries her about in her cloth kanga. Hale dresses Elizabeti and her family in modern, brightly patterned clothing that practically glows against the earth-toned, sketchily defined Tanzanian village in which this is set. Although Eva appears a bit too large for Elizabeti to handle as easily as she does, the illustrations reflect the story’s simplicity; accompanied by an attentive hen, Elizabeti follows her indulgent mother about, mimicking each nurturing activity. The object of Elizabeti’s affection may be peculiar, but the love itself is real. Later, she rescues Eva from the fire pit, tenderly cleans her, then cradles the stone until she—Elizabeti—falls asleep. Stuve-Bodeen’s debut is quirky but believable, lightly dusted with cultural detail, and features universal emotions in an unusual setting. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1998

ISBN: 1-880000-70-9

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Lee & Low Books

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 1998

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WILD, WILD WOLVES

At ``Step 2'' in the useful ``Step into Reading'' series: an admirably clear, well-balanced presentation that centers on wolves' habits and pack structure. Milton also addresses their endangered status, as well as their place in fantasy, folklore, and the popular imagination. Attractive realistic watercolors on almost every page. Top-notch: concise, but remarkably extensive in its coverage. A real bargain. (Nonfiction/Easy reader. 6-10)

Pub Date: April 1, 1992

ISBN: 0-679-91052-2

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 1992

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