ONE HUNDRED NAMES FOR LOVE by Diane Ackerman

ONE HUNDRED NAMES FOR LOVE

A Stroke, a Marriage, and the Language of Healing

KIRKUS REVIEW

From prolific poet and essayist Ackerman (Dawn Light: Dancing with Cranes and Other Ways to Start the Day, 2009, etc.), a sensitive memoir about how her relationship with her husband, novelist Paul West, evolved in the aftermath of his stroke.

In one tragic moment, the author watched her husband go from a man with perhaps “one of the largest working vocabularies on earth” to one who could only utter one syllable: “mem.” With most of the language centers in West’s brain crippled, the prognosis for improvement was grim. Undaunted, Ackerman sought standard language-relearning therapies for her husband, which met with frustratingly limited success. Then she tried more unconventional approaches that encouraged West to express himself through circumlocution and creative wordplay. The author understood that her husband needed to be “cajoled, tempted, led out, absorbed in chatting about everyday things, and surrounded by people who talked slowly to him but normally to one another.” As West regained greater linguistic fluency, Ackerman encouraged him to dictate his stroke experiences to her. This project—which was later published in 2008 as The Shadow Factory—offered her husband a way to link the person he had become with the person he had been. It also allowed a glimpse into the extraordinary inner world West had developed as a result of his illness. Soon after the stroke, he claimed to hear three distinct “voices” belonging to, respectively, a BBC announcer, a “tongue-tied aphasic” and a “language-loving scribe with American turns of phrase.” Though initially doomed by doctors to a vegetative existence, West eventually recovered enough to resume his writing and lead a limited, though relatively normal life.

Ackerman’s book is important for the guidance and hope it offers to stroke victims and their families, and it’s also a satisfying, tender and humane celebration of love between two literary elites.

Pub Date: April 4th, 2011
ISBN: 978-0-393-07241-9
Page count: 336pp
Publisher: Norton
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1st, 2011




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Kirkus Interview
Diane Ackerman
author of THE HUMAN AGE
September 8, 2014

Diane Ackerman is a poet who happens to write about science. Her latest book, The Human Age, is about the unprecedented fact that the human race is now the single dominant force of change on the planet. Humans have “subdued about 75 percent of the land surface, concocted a wizardry of industrial and medical marvels, strung lights all across the darkness.” Ackerman acknowledges the chaos humans have caused to the environment and yet she is still “enormously hopeful,” as she writes in the book, about how positive our interaction with Earth can be. We ask Ackerman about a few little things in this Kirkus TV interview: nature, evolution, humanity. View video >

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