While a bit uneven, this vivid work delivers a smorgasbord of practical ideas and fun recipes.

EATING GUIDE FOR FUSSY KIDS

ADVICE AND RECIPES BY EXPERTS

Three experts present a guide that’s part cookbook and part advice for worried parents.

Bubbling with hands-on tips for coaxing stubborn children to eat, this cheerful manual for parents garners information from sources like Britain’s National Health Service. Divided into five easy-to-read parts, the volume provides many color photographs from various sources of expressive kids and delectable dishes scattered throughout the pages. Section 1 features compelling testimony of a childhood eating disorder suffered by Sakkas (Revealing Psychiatry, 2015), a psychiatry professor from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. But his dark tone may startle some when he writes that in a family power struggle, children who won’t eat are “perverts” who are willing to suffer to punish their parents. Continuing the discussion, pediatrician Moustakas suggests using the senses—and a variety of colors—to induce children to eat. The debut author notes that kids love to touch their food, so anything too “hard or gluey” could be displeasing to them. Perhaps surprising to some, butter and sea salt are offered as “necessary” ingredients for children’s health. Section 2 presents 30 kid-friendly recipes—including veggie burgers, cheese cupcakes, pizza, and omelet wraps—by chef Togia (A Taste of Greece!, 2014, etc.). Her pleasant dishes, like savory “Granny’s meatballs,” could make little mouths water. Likewise, kids who help prepare creative concoctions, such as the egg-based “Toasted smiley face,” are more likely to be enthusiastic eaters. Written in a friendly, first-person voice, the guide provides recipe instructions that are clear and concise. But some recipes, such as “Chocolate cookies,” require knowledge of grams or kilograms—and will likely be confusing for readers who measure with cups or pounds. Inspired by Togia, a dad shares his own recipe ideas in Section 3—for example, pizza with vegetables. In Section 4, Sakkas returns with a thoughtful analysis of an eating disorder. After supplying 15 obvious tips—including that parents should remain calm—this well-referenced volume concludes with a useful glossary and appendices for further reading.

While a bit uneven, this vivid work delivers a smorgasbord of practical ideas and fun recipes.

Pub Date: July 31, 2018

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Stergiou Books Limited

Review Posted Online: Oct. 25, 2018

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If the authors are serious, this is a silly, distasteful book. If they are not, it’s a brilliant satire.

THE 48 LAWS OF POWER

The authors have created a sort of anti-Book of Virtues in this encyclopedic compendium of the ways and means of power.

Everyone wants power and everyone is in a constant duplicitous game to gain more power at the expense of others, according to Greene, a screenwriter and former editor at Esquire (Elffers, a book packager, designed the volume, with its attractive marginalia). We live today as courtiers once did in royal courts: we must appear civil while attempting to crush all those around us. This power game can be played well or poorly, and in these 48 laws culled from the history and wisdom of the world’s greatest power players are the rules that must be followed to win. These laws boil down to being as ruthless, selfish, manipulative, and deceitful as possible. Each law, however, gets its own chapter: “Conceal Your Intentions,” “Always Say Less Than Necessary,” “Pose as a Friend, Work as a Spy,” and so on. Each chapter is conveniently broken down into sections on what happened to those who transgressed or observed the particular law, the key elements in this law, and ways to defensively reverse this law when it’s used against you. Quotations in the margins amplify the lesson being taught. While compelling in the way an auto accident might be, the book is simply nonsense. Rules often contradict each other. We are told, for instance, to “be conspicuous at all cost,” then told to “behave like others.” More seriously, Greene never really defines “power,” and he merely asserts, rather than offers evidence for, the Hobbesian world of all against all in which he insists we live. The world may be like this at times, but often it isn’t. To ask why this is so would be a far more useful project.

If the authors are serious, this is a silly, distasteful book. If they are not, it’s a brilliant satire.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1998

ISBN: 0-670-88146-5

Page Count: 430

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 1998

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The author's youthfulness helps to assure the inevitable comparison with the Anne Frank diary although over and above the...

NIGHT

Elie Wiesel spent his early years in a small Transylvanian town as one of four children. 

He was the only one of the family to survive what Francois Maurois, in his introduction, calls the "human holocaust" of the persecution of the Jews, which began with the restrictions, the singularization of the yellow star, the enclosure within the ghetto, and went on to the mass deportations to the ovens of Auschwitz and Buchenwald. There are unforgettable and horrifying scenes here in this spare and sombre memoir of this experience of the hanging of a child, of his first farewell with his father who leaves him an inheritance of a knife and a spoon, and of his last goodbye at Buchenwald his father's corpse is already cold let alone the long months of survival under unconscionable conditions. 

The author's youthfulness helps to assure the inevitable comparison with the Anne Frank diary although over and above the sphere of suffering shared, and in this case extended to the death march itself, there is no spiritual or emotional legacy here to offset any reader reluctance.

Pub Date: Jan. 16, 2006

ISBN: 0374500010

Page Count: 120

Publisher: Hill & Wang

Review Posted Online: Oct. 7, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2006

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