Children will appreciate seeing how a boy with a keen eye helps to accomplish great things in this reimagining of biblical...

SHIMRI'S BIG IDEA

A boy saves the eighth-century B.C.E. city of Jerusalem from invading Assyrians.

Shimri is the youngest in his family and is always being told that he is too little for chores. Then, when he spills water on the “breakfast table” he carefully observes that a human, in this case his grandmother, can alter the course of the water. Accompanying his older sister past the city walls to fill a water jug, he notices a “dark opening in a large rock.” Back home, and again excluded from chores, he dances on the roof, causing the house to shake. When he learns that the king wants to build a tunnel to bring water inside the city walls, his grandmother encourages him to tell the king about his great idea to exploit his found crack in the rock for the building of this tunnel. Men making noise aboveground would guide builders digging from either end to a connecting spot. And so it came to pass in Weber’s version of a historical event. As written in 2 Chronicles 32:1-23, the Assyrians were mounting a siege against the Judean king Hezekiah, and he wanted to deny access to water outside the city to the invaders. Weber’s Jerusalem is peaceful, almost idyllic, a mood reinforced by the colorfully appareled inhabitants going about their daily activities as portrayed in Bousidan’s illustrations.

Children will appreciate seeing how a boy with a keen eye helps to accomplish great things in this reimagining of biblical history. (Picture book. 4-7)

Pub Date: April 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-68115-541-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Apples & Honey Press

Review Posted Online: Feb. 13, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2019

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

The story of Noah and the Ark provides a lesson in living together in peace

WORSE AND WORSE ON NOAH'S ARK

Life on the ark wasn’t always a lark.

Noah follows God’s commandment to build a really big ark with the help of his wife and his sons. In a bit of linguistic license, Mrs. Noah turns to Yiddish to complain, as do the sons. What with the constant rain, things just get “WORSE and WORSE and WORSE.” The animals arrive, and the ark gets crowded, dirty, and throwing-up smelly. Yes, it keeps getting worse. Then the critters begin to argue among themselves and eye one another hungrily. The smells increase, and the Noah family wonders one more time, “Could things get any worse?” They do when the ark springs a leak, but Noah has a solution: cooperation. Tranquility and a good-neighbor policy result. The flood ends, and the Noah family and the animals all happily disembark. In her notes, the author states that she has told her tale following the Judaic tradition of midrash, stories that elucidate Biblical text. She also hopes that readers of her book will learn to live in “harmony,” with “empathy,” and “peacefully.” Mineker’s illustrations against a white background provide amusing views of the animals; readers will chuckle at details such as the blissfully sleeping sloths and sneezing squirrels. The humans are depicted with white and brown faces.

The story of Noah and the Ark provides a lesson in living together in peace . (Picture book. 4-6)

Pub Date: April 1, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-68115-554-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Apples & Honey Press

Review Posted Online: Jan. 12, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2020

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

TATANKA AND THE LAKOTA PEOPLE

A CREATION STORY

An Oglala Lakota, Montileaux first created the ledger-style paintings (flat, two-dimensional) in this offering for exhibit at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre, S.D. The illustrations are characterized by clear vibrant colors and characters that are portrayed in dramatic poses and facial expressions. The exhibit committee selected the traditional text that accompanies the illustrations in this telling of how the Lakota People were tricked into leaving the Underworld through the Wind Cave to live on the surface of the earth. They became “the Ordinary,” or Lakota. Sensing that his people needed help to survive, the holy man, Tatanka, transformed himself into a buffalo and sacrificed his powers in order to provide food and warmth to the Lakota people. Both the English and the original Lakota words are used side-by-side on each page. A beautiful rendering of story and illustration that needs to be in every library interested in building the diversity of their collection. (Picture book/mythology. 5-7)

Pub Date: Oct. 15, 2006

ISBN: 0-9749195-8-6

Page Count: 48

Publisher: SDSHS Press

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2006

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more