ISAAC'S STORM by Erik Larson

ISAAC'S STORM

A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History

KIRKUS REVIEW

There is bad weather, and there are 100-year storms. Then there are meteorological events. In September 1900, one of the latter visited Galveston, Tex., and ate the city alive. Larson tells the story with (at times overnourished) brio. The Isaac in Larson’s (Lethal Passage: How the Travels of a Single Handgun Expose the Roots of America’s Gun Crisis, 1994) title is Isaac Cline: head meteorologist of the Galveston station of the US Weather Bureau in 1900, a man who thought he had the drop on weather systems because he had data, and from data he could predict the meteorological future. But, as Larson shows, from Philo of Byzantium in 300 b.c. to the talking weatherheads of today, forecasting the weather has always been a “black and dangerous art.” When Cline blithely stated that Galveston’s vulnerability to extreme weather was “an absurd delusion,” he was inviting trouble, and it came calling. A series of administrative snafus and ignored warnings from Cuba found the city unprepared for the monster rogue hurricane. The air turned wild and gray, a storm surge swept over the city, the wind became “a thousands little devils, shrieking and whistling,” said a survivor. It is now thought to have topped 150 mph. “Slate fractured skulls and removed limbs. Venomous snakes spiraled upward into trees occupied by people. A rocket of timber killed a horse in mid-gallop.” It’s estimated that 8,000 people died, and Cline was not decorated for his brilliant forecasting by a grateful city government. Larson paints a withering portrait of the early Weather Bureau and offers a wild and woolly reconstruction of the storm, full of gripping anecdotal accounts told with flair, even if he overplays the portents, sapping their menace and turning them into a melodrama most often accompanied by trembling piano keys. Cline saw himself as “a scientist, not some farmer who gauged the weather by aches in his rheumatoid knee.” He should have listened to his bones. Larson captures his ignominy, and the storm in its fury. (Author tour)

Pub Date: Sept. 8th, 1999
ISBN: 0-609-60233-0
Page count: 320pp
Publisher: Crown
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1st, 1999




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