Max relates to Billy’s issue of often waking up in a wet bed; he did not outgrow bedwetting until he “was eleven years old!”...

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MAX ARCHER KID DETECTIVE: THE CASE OF THE WET BED

Max is a detective who likes to “help kids with their problems”—this case takes on bedwetting.

Max relates to Billy’s issue of often waking up in a wet bed; he did not outgrow bedwetting until he “was eleven years old!” The fictional story allows Max to carefully take Billy and readers through this easy-to-read informational book about how to stay dry at night. Bennett strikes the right balance between story and self-help to provide a title whose tone and careful explanations both parents and kids will appreciate. The book puts the problem in context: “five million kids in the United States…go to bed…not knowing if they will wake up wet or dry.” What follows is a clear plan ably complemented by Gerrell’s superb cartoon illustrations of Max and Billy on the case as they investigate the digestive system, how a bladder works and ways to better signal the brain to get up and go. At the back of the book there is extra information about pooping and its impact on bedwetting, a word search about proper foods to eat and a “Q&A About Bedwetting (Just for Parents!)”

Pub Date: May 15, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-4338-0953-8

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Magination/American Psychological Association

Review Posted Online: May 4, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 15, 2011

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Formulaic but not stale…even if it does mine previous topical material rather than expand it.

HOW DO DINOSAURS SHOW GOOD MANNERS?

From the How Do Dinosaurs…? series

A guide to better behavior—at home, on the playground, in class, and in the library.

Serving as a sort of overview for the series’ 12 previous exercises in behavior modeling, this latest outing opens with a set of badly behaving dinos, identified in an endpaper key and also inconspicuously in situ. Per series formula, these are paired to leading questions like “Does she spit out her broccoli onto the floor? / Does he shout ‘I hate meat loaf!’ while slamming the door?” (Choruses of “NO!” from young audiences are welcome.) Midway through, the tone changes (“No, dinosaurs don’t”), and good examples follow to the tune of positive declarative sentences: “They wipe up the tables and vacuum the floors. / They share all the books and they never slam doors,” etc. Teague’s customary, humongous prehistoric crew, all depicted in exact detail and with wildly flashy coloration, fill both their spreads and their human-scale scenes as their human parents—no same-sex couples but some are racially mixed, and in one the man’s the cook—join a similarly diverse set of sibs and other children in either disapprobation or approving smiles. All in all, it’s a well-tested mix of oblique and prescriptive approaches to proper behavior as well as a lighthearted way to play up the use of “please,” “thank you,” and even “I’ll help when you’re hurt.”

Formulaic but not stale…even if it does mine previous topical material rather than expand it. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 20, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-338-36334-0

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Blue Sky/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: Aug. 18, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2020

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A somewhat wordy but helpful manual for children in similar situations.

SAM LOSES HIS TONSILS

A child gets his tonsils removed in Olorunfemi’s picture book.

Sam, a dark-haired, dark-skinned child, visits an Ears Nose and Throat specialist and learns that his oversized adenoids and tonsils must be removed via surgery. He is also diagnosed with sleep apnea. The book chronicles Sam’s experience leading up to his surgery including details like how he can’t eat or drink the night before. At the hospital, Sam gets hooked up to machines and receives “sleepy medicine” [8] called anesthesia. The nurses and surgeon are kind so Sam “wasn’t afraid…and was so happy he would be able to sleep better afterward.”[6] After surgery "Sam was fully awake with no... complications…and…discharged…the same day.”[8] Sam is thrilled that he no longer snores. Although his throat hurts and he can’t eat certain foods, Sam is happy to get home to his siblings and awakens feeling energized. The book functions well as a child-friendly clinical manual as opposed to a story with a plot. The author, an RN, displays clear knowledge of ENT procedures. The medical jargon and details are child-appropriate. Occasionally the text lags and includes unnecessary details like the ages of Sam’s siblings[2]. Still, this is an approachable tool for children requiring ENT procedures. The illustrations mirror the text. Some offer subtext like a scene showing masked surgeons performing Sam’s surgery. Others emphasize medical elements like a closeup of Sam’s throat and tonsils. A somewhat wordy but helpful manual for children in similar situations.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 17

Publisher: FriesenPress

Review Posted Online: April 2, 2020

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