Competent coverage of a sadly underrepresented holiday.

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THE EID AL-ADHA ADVENTURE

From the Peg + Cat series

On the Islamic holiday of Eid al-Adha, Peg + Cat practice math and kindness.

Peg, a white girl with strawberry-blonde hair, and Cat, a purple feline, visit their friends Yasmina, a beige-skinned girl wearing a hijab, and Amir, a light-brown–skinned boy wearing a suit and tie with sandals. Eid al-Adha is a “very special holiday” that Peg and Cat “had never even heard of.” Following the signature Peg + Cat formula, they first “rock out” in song. Since Eid al-Adha is about “giving to those with less,” the less than/more than mathematical symbols are introduced. The four characters play musical instruments, and Yasmina piles a silver tray with foods. Following Islamic tradition, they separate the meat into thirds: one-third for the family, one-third for neighbors and friends, and one-third for charity. Amir places two meatballs on each plate, but Peg notices that the meatballs are different sizes. This is a “Big Problem,” which they solve with a pan balance. Finally, they head out to the party. When they stop at the soup kitchen to donate some meatballs, they use math again to help out there, and when Cat shares his coveted honey cakes, he discovers how good it feels to give. The illustrations (assembled from the TV episode the book is based on) are cartoony and colorful, with graphing paper and mathematical equations in the background. Fans of Peg + Cat will enjoy learning about the Islamic holiday, but readers unfamiliar with the show may not appreciate the book’s formulaic structure.

Competent coverage of a sadly underrepresented holiday. (Picture book. 3-8)

Pub Date: June 26, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-7636-9932-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Candlewick Entertainment

Review Posted Online: April 16, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 2018

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Though it will never usurp Dr. Seuss, it will still find a home where Christian families of faith seek inspirational picture...

WHEN I PRAY FOR YOU

Turner adds another title to his picture-book series that highlights the miracles in the mundane (When God Made Light, 2018, etc.).

In the vein of children’s-bookshelf stalwart Oh, the Places You’ll Go, Turner’s rhyming text includes both prayers and life advice for a growing child, beginning with infancy and moving on to adolescence. At times the rhyme and meter are strained, muddling meaning and making the tempo feel occasionally awkward when read aloud. Overall, though, the book executes its mission, presenting Christian theological truths within the rhythmic inspirational text. For this third series installment Turner’s text is paired with a new illustrator, whose bright illustrations of wide-eyed children have great shelf appeal. While David Catrow’s previous illustrations in the series featured effervescent black protagonists, the child in Barnes’ illustrations appears white, though she occupies an otherwise diverse world. While illustrated as a prayer from a mother for her daughter, the text itself is gender neutral.

Though it will never usurp Dr. Seuss, it will still find a home where Christian families of faith seek inspirational picture books. (Picture book/religion. 3-6)

Pub Date: Feb. 19, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-52565058-4

Page Count: 48

Publisher: WaterBrook

Review Posted Online: Dec. 5, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2019

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A lesson in diversity and making people welcome that starts kids off on the right foot in these rough, divided times.

CLICK, CLACK, MOO I LOVE YOU!

A little diversity goes a long way toward getting the party started in this latest farm tale from Cronin and Lewis.

While Farmer Brown is busy fixing up the farmyard, mucking out the pigpen, giving hay to the donkey, and mending fences, Little Duck is just as busy spiffing up the barn for a dance, hanging streamers and lights and balloons and cutting out hearts to make valentines for all her guests (glitter festoons the book). That evening, Little Duck and her guests are great examples of host and guests; she greets everyone individually with a valentine, and they give her food for the party. (Except the cows; they are at a fancy ball.) Music gets the dancing started, but not the mingling—at least until one last, late arrival. Will Little Fox add to the party or eat the party? Little Duck isn’t daunted. She hands her last card to Little Fox, and they cut a rug, inspiring the rest of the guests to mingle freely until the cows (literally) come home. Lewin’s characters are a delight, their facial expressions bringing life to this party. And the mice doing the hustle? They are worth the price of admission all by themselves.

A lesson in diversity and making people welcome that starts kids off on the right foot in these rough, divided times. (Picture book. 3-8)

Pub Date: Dec. 5, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4814-4496-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Caitlyn Dlouhy/Atheneum

Review Posted Online: Sept. 18, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2017

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