COWBOYS AND LONGHORNS by Jerry Stanley

COWBOYS AND LONGHORNS

A Portrait of the Long Drive
Age Range: 10 & up

KIRKUS REVIEW

They were independent, freedom-loving, and strong—the longhorns, that is. The cowboys were most often bored, tired, and part of an organized unit rather than independent. The Hollywood image of the cowboy more accurately described the cattle that the cowboys were driving; it was the longhorns that created the American cowboy and the heyday of cattle drives from 1866 to 1885. Longhorns were a new breed, a mix of Mexican and Anglo cattle from west Texas, able to run for two miles without stopping or sleeping. Stanley weaves in much history of the southwest and tells a fascinating tale of the cruelty, hazards, social hierarchy, and day-to-day life on the Chisholm Trail. A clear, casual writing style and abundant photographs and artists’ renderings of scenes create a lively story. The bibliography is dense and uninviting, but overall this is an attractive, accessible portrait of cowboys, longhorns, and an era. (map, picture credits, index) (Nonfiction. 10+)

Pub Date: Aug. 12th, 2003
ISBN: 0-375-81565-1
Page count: 128pp
Publisher: Crown
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15th, 2003