Part valentine, part press release.

WHERE IS OUR LIBRARY?

A STORY OF PATIENCE AND FORTITUDE

The New York Public Library’s iconic lions go in search of their vanished Children’s Center.

Following on Lost in the Library (2018), bibliobeasts Patience and Fortitude, stunned to find the shelves in their beloved children’s library on 42nd Street empty, set out on a rhymed, nocturnal hunt that takes them past a number of Manhattan literary landmarks and into several library branches before ending (spoiler alert) at the entrance to the Center’s new location across the street. Whether or not the Covid-19 pandemic throws the timing of this blatant bit of marketing for a loop (the opening has already been delayed once), the tour is rich in pleasures for children’s-lit fans—not only for its glimpses of library buildings and interiors both historic and up to date (Manhattan ones anyway, with one quick trip to the Bronx…Staten Island, as usual, gets the brushoff), but for the visual references to new and older classics that Lewis packs into many scenes. A formal announcement of the move at the end includes a key to books and branches included in the art. There are no human figures in sight until a final, thinly but diversely populated, daylight view of the old and the newly renovated libraries facing each other on Fifth Avenue. (This book was reviewed digitally with 10-by-20-inch double-page spreads viewed at 75% of actual size.)

Part valentine, part press release. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Oct. 27, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-250-24140-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: Aug. 18, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2020

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A lesson that never grows old, enacted with verve by two favorite friends

WAITING IS NOT EASY!

From the Elephant & Piggie series

Gerald the elephant learns a truth familiar to every preschooler—heck, every human: “Waiting is not easy!”

When Piggie cartwheels up to Gerald announcing that she has a surprise for him, Gerald is less than pleased to learn that the “surprise is a surprise.” Gerald pumps Piggie for information (it’s big, it’s pretty, and they can share it), but Piggie holds fast on this basic principle: Gerald will have to wait. Gerald lets out an almighty “GROAN!” Variations on this basic exchange occur throughout the day; Gerald pleads, Piggie insists they must wait; Gerald groans. As the day turns to twilight (signaled by the backgrounds that darken from mauve to gray to charcoal), Gerald gets grumpy. “WE HAVE WASTED THE WHOLE DAY!…And for WHAT!?” Piggie then gestures up to the Milky Way, which an awed Gerald acknowledges “was worth the wait.” Willems relies even more than usual on the slightest of changes in posture, layout and typography, as two waiting figures can’t help but be pretty static. At one point, Piggie assumes the lotus position, infuriating Gerald. Most amusingly, Gerald’s elephantine groans assume weighty physicality in spread-filling speech bubbles that knock Piggie to the ground. And the spectacular, photo-collaged images of the Milky Way that dwarf the two friends makes it clear that it was indeed worth the wait.

A lesson that never grows old, enacted with verve by two favorite friends . (Early reader. 6-8)

Pub Date: Nov. 4, 2014

ISBN: 978-1-4231-9957-1

Page Count: 64

Publisher: Hyperion

Review Posted Online: Nov. 5, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2014

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Readers who (inexplicably) find David Lawrence’s Pickle and Penguin (2004) just too weird may settle in more comfortably...

LOST AND FOUND

A lad finds a penguin on his doorstep and resolutely sets out to return it in this briefly told import. 

Eventually, he ends up rowing it all the way back to Antarctica, braving waves and storms, filling in the time by telling it stories. But then, feeling lonely after he drops his silent charge off, he belatedly realizes that it was probably lonely too, and turns back to find it. Seeing Jeffers’s small, distant figures in wide, simply brushed land- and sea-scapes, young viewers will probably cotton to the penguin’s feelings before the boy himself does—but all’s well that ends well, and the reunited companions are last seen adrift together in the wide blue sea. 

Readers who (inexplicably) find David Lawrence’s Pickle and Penguin (2004) just too weird may settle in more comfortably with this—slightly—less offbeat friendship tale. (Picture book. 6-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2006

ISBN: 0-399-24503-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Philomel

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2005

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