Needs to find its way into the hands of anyone who ever identifies as a girl.

THE CONFIDENCE CODE FOR GIRLS

TAKING RISKS, MESSING UP, AND BECOMING YOUR AMAZINGLY IMPERFECT, TOTALLY POWERFUL SELF

This junior version of The Confidence Code (2014) encourages pre- and early-teen girls to crack the Code, building the skills they need to meet challenges with “Why not?” instead of “No way!”

Confidence is “that incredible energy when you find your courage and try something that’s not easy,” and the book’s goal is to help readers discover their individual codes. It is divided into three sections, each culminating with one of the Code’s three elements: “Risk More!” “Think Less!” “Be Yourself!” The authors suggest readers begin a “Confidence Notebook” in which to do the book’s activities, including “Confidence Warm-ups” and “Your Turn” exercises, as well as take “Confidence Quizzes” and puzzle out “Confidence Conundrums.” “Girls of Action” and “Confidence Close-ups” sidebars profile real girls and their confidence struggles and triumphs. Featured girls include Amiya Zafar, an American Muslim boxer who fought to wear her hijab during bouts; Cordelia Longo, an Asian-American girl who worked to make sanitary products free in her school; and the transition journey of a girl named Toni who was born “Tony.” “Quick Quotes” from real girls, cartoon illustrations (with a commendably diverse cast), and faux hand-lettering provide lots of engagement. Backmatter includes a lengthy list of resources and endnotes, both of which provide a trove of information from reputable sources.

Needs to find its way into the hands of anyone who ever identifies as a girl. (Nonfiction. 8-14)

Pub Date: April 3, 2018

ISBN: 978-0-06-279698-1

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Harper/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: May 22, 2018

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

With young readers diagnosed with anxiety in ever increasing numbers, this book offers a necessary mirror to many.

GUTS

Young Raina is 9 when she throws up for the first time that she remembers, due to a stomach bug. Even a year later, when she is in fifth grade, she fears getting sick.

Raina begins having regular stomachaches that keep her home from school. She worries about sharing food with her friends and eating certain kinds of foods, afraid of getting sick or food poisoning. Raina’s mother enrolls her in therapy. At first Raina isn’t sure about seeing a therapist, but over time she develops healthy coping mechanisms to deal with her stress and anxiety. Her therapist helps her learn to ground herself and relax, and in turn she teaches her classmates for a school project. Amping up the green, wavy lines to evoke Raina’s nausea, Telgemeier brilliantly produces extremely accurate visual representations of stress and anxiety. Thought bubbles surround Raina in some panels, crowding her with anxious “what if”s, while in others her negative self-talk appears to be literally crushing her. Even as she copes with anxiety disorder and what is eventually diagnosed as mild irritable bowel syndrome, she experiences the typical stresses of school life, going from cheer to panic in the blink of an eye. Raina is white, and her classmates are diverse; one best friend is Korean American.

With young readers diagnosed with anxiety in ever increasing numbers, this book offers a necessary mirror to many. (Graphic memoir. 8-12)

Pub Date: Sept. 17, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-545-85251-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Graphix/Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 12, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2019

Did you like this book?

A likable journey that is sensitive to the triumphs and agonies of being a 13-year-old girl.

FRIENDS FOREVER

From the Friends series , Vol. 3

Shannon just wants to get through eighth grade in one piece—while feeling like her own worst enemy.

In this third entry in popular author for young people Hale’s graphic memoir series, the young, sensitive overachiever is crushed by expectations: to be cool but loyal to her tightknit and dramatic friend group, a top student but not a nerd, attractive to boys but true to her ideals. As events in Shannon’s life begin to overwhelm her, she works toward finding a way to love and understand herself, follow her passions for theater and writing, and ignore her cruel inner voice. Capturing the visceral embarrassments of middle school in 1987 Salt Lake City, Shannon’s emotions are vivid and often excruciating. In particular, the social norms of a church-oriented family are clearly addressed, and religion is shown as being both a comfort and a struggle for Shannon. While the text is sometimes in danger of spelling things out a little too neatly and obviously, the emotional honesty and sincerity drawn from Hale’s own life win out. Pham’s artwork is vibrant and appealing, with stylistic changes for Shannon’s imaginings and the leeching out of color and use of creative panel structures as her anxiety and depression worsen.

A likable journey that is sensitive to the triumphs and agonies of being a 13-year-old girl. (author's note, gallery) (Graphic memoir. 10-14)

Pub Date: Aug. 31, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-250-31755-1

Page Count: 320

Publisher: First Second

Review Posted Online: June 11, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 2021

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more