GONE WITH THE WIND by Margaret Mitchell
Kirkus Star

GONE WITH THE WIND

KIRKUS REVIEW

Don't sell this as primarily a novel of the Civil War. Sell it rather as a novel in human emotions against the background of the Civil War and its aftermath. It has the finer qualities of So Red The Rose, -- the authentic picture of people and places and incidents, something of the moonlight and honeysuckle of the glamorous Old South, much of the traditions and manner of life and thought. It has too great length -- the author will learn with experience the valuable and essential lesson of selection. But, from the point of view of story and characterization, I found it more absorbing reading, more vital characterization than the Stark Young book. Instead of taking form as a succession of pictures from a family album, the characters come to life with the impact of life upon them, and their impact, one upon the other. The central figure is a girl, spoiled, selfish, dominating, wilful, magnetic, -- you hate her, you long to throttle her -- but you can't help acknowledging her fascination and admiring her spirit. An opportunist, yes, but she pays the price. The author comes from the state of which she writes -- Georgia -- and she knows her background thoroughly. She can write.
Pub Date: June 30th, 1936
ISBN: 1416548890
Page count: 33pp
Publisher: Macmillan
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1st, 1936




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