Next book

FREE TO BE...YOU AND ME

35TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Some 35 or so years on, a self-empowerment classic gets a long-overdue makeover featuring minor changes to the written content but nearly all-new art. The poems, lyrics, parables, dialogues and short stories—contributed by the likes of Shel Silverstein, Dan Greenburg, Judith Viorst and Judy Blume—are as fresh as ever, even barely (if at all) revised. They’ve never looked better either, thanks to new pictures from more than a dozen illustrators from Tony DiTerlizzi and David Catrow to Jerry Pinkney and Peter Sís. Two entries in the original have been dropped, two (including a closing comment by Kurt Vonnegut) added, their order lightly massaged and all of the musical arrangements grouped together at the end. The result makes as persuasive an argument as ever against prescriptive sex or life roles: As Thomas writes, “ ‘Should’ is a small and bossy word. ‘Could’ is as big and beautiful as the sky.” Packaged with a CD (not heard). (Anthology. 9-11)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2008

ISBN: 978-0-7624-3060-4

Page Count: 144

Publisher: Running Press

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2008

Next book

MUSTACHES FOR MADDIE

Medically, both squicky and hopeful; emotionally, unbelievably squeaky-clean.

A 12-year-old copes with a brain tumor.

Maddie likes potatoes and fake mustaches. Kids at school are nice (except one whom readers will see instantly is a bully); soon they’ll get to perform Shakespeare scenes in a unit they’ve all been looking forward to. But recent dysfunctions in Maddie’s arm and leg mean, stunningly, that she has a brain tumor. She has two surgeries, the first successful, the second taking place after the book’s end, leaving readers hanging. The tumor’s not malignant, but it—or the surgeries—could cause sight loss, personality change, or death. The descriptions of surgery aren’t for the faint of heart. The authors—parents of a real-life Maddie who really had a brain tumor—imbue fictional Maddie’s first-person narration with quirky turns of phrase (“For the love of potatoes!”) and whimsy (she imagines her medical battles as epic fantasy fights and pretends MRI stands for Mustard Rat from Indiana or Mustaches Rock Importantly), but they also portray her as a model sick kid. She’s frightened but never acts out, snaps, or resists. Her most frequent commentary about the tumor, having her skull opened, and the possibility of death is “Boo” or “Super boo.” She even shoulders the bully’s redemption. Maddie and most characters are white; one cringe-inducing hallucinatory surgery dream involves “chanting island natives” and a “witch doctor lady.”

Medically, both squicky and hopeful; emotionally, unbelievably squeaky-clean. (authors’ note, discussion questions) (Fiction. 9-11)

Pub Date: Oct. 3, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-62972-330-3

Page Count: 256

Publisher: Shadow Mountain

Review Posted Online: Aug. 1, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2017

Next book

DAVID GOES TO SCHOOL

The poster boy for relentless mischief-makers everywhere, first encountered in No, David! (1998), gives his weary mother a rest by going to school. Naturally, he’s tardy, and that’s but the first in a long string of offenses—“Sit down, David! Keep your hands to yourself! PAY ATTENTION!”—that culminates in an afterschool stint. Children will, of course, recognize every line of the text and every one of David’s moves, and although he doesn’t exhibit the larger- than-life quality that made him a tall-tale anti-hero in his first appearance, his round-headed, gap-toothed enthusiasm is still endearing. For all his disruptive behavior, he shows not a trace of malice, and it’ll be easy for readers to want to encourage his further exploits. (Picture book. 5-7)

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-590-48087-1

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Scholastic

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1999

Close Quickview