Sure to encourage readers to go outside and get to know their animal neighbors.

ANIMAL WATCHING

THE DEFINITIVE INTERACTIVE NATURE GUIDE

From the Outdoor School series

Part of the Outdoor School series, this book presents the animal world of North America.

Following the same clear organization as other books in the series, this one covers birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles, and fish. How to be respectful of wildlife while observing them; how animals behave and why; where to look for them; how to identify wildlife using shape, size, color, behavior, and location; and other information is presented in easily digestible segments interspersed with plenty of full-color illustrations. Activities to encourage readers to put their newly acquired knowledge to work in the “Try It,” “Track It,” and “Take it to the Next Level” sections include prepared templates for young people to use to write, draw, and make notes about their discoveries and to affirm their progress by checking off and dating accomplishments. Each color-coded subject segment includes a field guide—also featuring areas for them to jot down notes. The metal-encased cover corners and sewn binding ensure the book will stand up to many trips outdoors. While emphatic about not doing anything dangerous, the book nonetheless encourages budding naturalists to try myriad activities that get them actively observing the natural world. This volume’s narrative style is breezier than the others in the series, with plenty of cheeky asides that skew the tone toward a younger audience.

Sure to encourage readers to go outside and get to know their animal neighbors. (index) (Nonfiction. 10-14)

Pub Date: April 27, 2021

ISBN: 978-1-250-23083-6

Page Count: 448

Publisher: Odd Dot

Review Posted Online: March 31, 2021

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2021

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A stimulating plunge for casual browsers and serious students alike.

ULTIMATE OCEANPEDIA

THE MOST COMPLETE OCEAN REFERENCE EVER

A compendium of all things oceanic, from surface to depths, covering biology, geology, coasts, climatic phenomena, and human use and abuse.

Considering the size of the general topic, the coverage isn’t as shallow as it might be. Hundreds of crisply professional nature photos and big, easy-to-follow charts and diagrams anchor waves of densely packed but often breezy commentary (“Many parrotfish species also make their own sleeping bags at night—out of mucus!”) that Wilsdon pours in beneath such headers as “It’s a Shore Thing” and “Belize It or Not!” Overviews of each ocean, of plate tectonics, the action and effects of ocean currents, worldwide climate change, and physical features from islands to abyssal plains sail by in succession, but marine biology takes pride of place with page after page of photogenic sea life from tiny krill on up to whales and polar bears. The author profiles a marine ecologist and interviews an oceanographer to cap chapters on modern research, exploration, and industries, then closes with generous lists of sites to visit physically or virtually.

A stimulating plunge for casual browsers and serious students alike. (glossary, index) (Nonfiction. 11-14)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4263-2550-2

Page Count: 272

Publisher: National Geographic Kids

Review Posted Online: Nov. 23, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2016

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During the Great Depression, women's ice-hockey teams across Canada fought an uphill battle to scrape together enough money...

QUEENS OF THE ICE

In the 1930s, the Canadian female ice-hockey team called the Rivulettes dominated the ice.

During the Great Depression, women's ice-hockey teams across Canada fought an uphill battle to scrape together enough money to play. From 1931-1940, the Preston Rivulettes, led by Hilda Ranscome, overwhelmed all other teams, capturing the national title in the four years that they could afford to travel far enough to compete for it. With the pressure of the war, and because they were no longer capturing fan enthusiasm since they always won, the Rivulettes disbanded in 1942. After the war, the culture had changed, and women’s ice hockey nearly disappeared until a recent rebirth. This effort describes in detail many of the key games the team played over that decade and the way that their remarkable record has been largely ignored by the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto. Though the book effectively captures the scrappy nature of the games (with numerous penalties in each for high sticking and fighting), disappointingly, it lacks any significant biographical information on team members. Only a couple are very briefly sketched. Readers will wonder what made this team so great; more information about the players might have provided key insights.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 2011

ISBN: 978-1-55277-721-3

Page Count: 136

Publisher: James Lorimer

Review Posted Online: July 20, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2011

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