This third in an engaging series of “seriously funny facts about your favorite animals” will both please and inform.

THE TRUTH ABOUT DOLPHINS

From the Truth About Your Favorite Animals series

Facts about dolphins, fancifully presented.

Eaton’s introduction to the dolphin family is enlivened by humorous, digitally colored pen-and-ink cartoon-style drawings. Each spread presents important points in one to four sentences in a thick, readable typeface. These facts include the differences between dolphins and fish, their mammalian characteristics, the tail-first birth of their calves, their ubiquity in the world’s oceans, their behavior (hunting methods and usual prey, echolocation, communication, playfulness, cooperation), and threats they face. One spread shows examples of eight of the 40 dolphin species and gives weights for the smallest and largest. Speech bubbles add information and humor, especially from a sea gull commentator. There are some human onlookers, too, a brown-skinned girl and her diverse companions. The selected facts are accurate, appealing, and important; the threats—toxic pollution, boat traffic, industrial fishing, and the changing climate—are presented lightly along with the reassuring statement “you can help by learning about dolphins and then teaching others.” The package concludes with two pages of additional information and suggestions for further research. The difference between fact and fancy should be obvious even to elementary-age readers, who will enjoy the occasional silliness.

This third in an engaging series of “seriously funny facts about your favorite animals” will both please and inform. (Informational picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: May 8, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-62672-668-0

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Neal Porter/Roaring Brook

Review Posted Online: Feb. 19, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2018

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This heartwarming story of a boy and his beloved dog opens the door for further study of our 16th president.

HONEY, THE DOG WHO SAVED ABE LINCOLN

A slice of Abraham Lincoln’s childhood life is explored through a fictionalized anecdote about his dog Honey.

When 7-year-old Abe rescues a golden-brown dog with a broken leg, he takes the pup home to the Lincolns’ cabin in Knob Creek, Kentucky. Honey follows Abe everywhere, including trailing after his owner into a deep cave. When Abe gets stuck between rocks, Honey goes for help and leads a search party back to the trapped boy for a dramatic rescue. The source for this story was a book incorporating the memories of Abe’s boyhood friend, explained in an author’s note. The well-paced text includes invented dialogue attributed to Abe and his parents. Abe’s older sister, Sarah, is not mentioned in the text and is shown in the illustrations as a little girl younger than Abe. All the characters present white save for one black man in the rescue crew. An oversized format and multiple double-page spreads provide plenty of space for cartoon-style illustrations of the Lincoln cabin, the surrounding countryside, and the spooky cave where Abe was trapped. This story focuses on the incident in the cave and Abe’s rescue; a more complete look at Lincoln’s life is included in an appended timeline and the author’s note, both of which include references to Lincoln’s kindness to animals and to other pets he owned.

This heartwarming story of a boy and his beloved dog opens the door for further study of our 16th president. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 14, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-06-269900-8

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Katherine Tegen/HarperCollins

Review Posted Online: Sept. 29, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 2019

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For many readers, uneasy optics will take the fun out of this romp.

LLAMA UNLEASHES THE ALPACALYPSE

From the Llama Book series

Llamas, alpacas, and clones—oh my!

In this sequel to Llama Destroys the World (2019), hapless Llama once again wreaks unintentional, large-scale havoc—but this time, he (sort of) saves the day, too. After making an epic breakfast (and epic mess), Llama decides to build a machine that will enable him to avoid cleaning up. No, not a vacuum or dishwasher: It’s a machine that Llama uses to clone his friend “of impeccable tidiness,” Alpaca, in order to create an “army of cleaners.” Cream-colored Llama and light-brown Alpaca, both male, are pear shaped with short, stubby legs, bland expressions, and bulging eyes. Paired with the cartoon illustrations, the text’s comic timing shines: “Llama invited Alpaca over for lunch. / Llama invited Alpaca into the Replicator 3000. / And then, Llama invited disaster.” Soon the house is full of smiling Alpacas in purple scalloped aprons, single-mindedly cleaning—and, as one might expect, things don’t go as planned. Mealtimes (i.e. “second lunch” and dinner) offer opportunities for the “alpacalypse” to emerge from Llama’s house into the wider world. Everyday life grinds to a halt as the myriad Alpacas bearing mops, dusters, and plungers continue their cleaning crusade with no signs of stopping. That is, until the Alpacas realize they are hungry….It’s all very funny, but the sight of the paler-coated Llama exploiting the darker-coated Alpaca, for whom nothing brings “more joy than cleaning,” is an uncomfortable one.

For many readers, uneasy optics will take the fun out of this romp. (Picture book. 4-8)

Pub Date: May 5, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-250-22285-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: March 29, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 15, 2020

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