Books by Maxwell Eaton III

THE TRUTH ABOUT CROCODILES by Maxwell Eaton III
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 7, 2019

" A party to remember—and a species to respect. (Informational picture book. 4-9)"
Get to know the crocodilian family—crocodiles, alligators and caimans, and gharials—at an eventful birthday party. Read full book review >
THE TRUTH ABOUT ELEPHANTS by Maxwell Eaton III
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 27, 2018

"Like the rest of the series, charming, informative, and effective. (Informational picture book. 4-9)"
In his fourth book exploring "seriously funny facts about your favorite animals," Eaton delivers "tons of information" about elephants. Read full book review >
THE TRUTH ABOUT DOLPHINS by Maxwell Eaton III
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 8, 2018

"This third in an engaging series of 'seriously funny facts about your favorite animals' will both please and inform. (Informational picture book. 4-8)"
Facts about dolphins, fancifully presented. Read full book review >
THE TRUTH ABOUT HIPPOS by Maxwell Eaton III
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 27, 2018

"A promising first entry in a new series of picture books introducing iconic mammals to young readers with a sense of humor. (Informational picture book. 5-9)"
Fast facts about hippopotamuses embedded in cartoons. Read full book review >
I'M AWAKE! by Maxwell Eaton III
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 2, 2017

"Sure to gather fans in its wake. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A rambunctious hamster tests its sleepy dad's patience. Read full book review >
THE FLYING BEAVER BROTHERS AND THE HOT AIR BABOONS by Maxwell Eaton III
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 5, 2014

"If the story is disappointing, it's only because the earlier books in the series set such a high standard: All of the jokes work, but die-hard fans may feel a little exhausted, as though they'd just finished their 100th Mad Lib in a row. (Graphic novel. 6-9)"
The Flying Beaver Brothers comics are starting to resemble Mad Libs. Read full book review >
OKAY, ANDY by Maxwell Eaton III
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 11, 2014

"Eaton's book covers well-trod ground and unfortunately pales in the shadows of more-established series. (Graphic early reader. 4-8)"
A silly buddy story about Andy the alligator and his mammalian friend Preston plods somewhat aimlessly along through three chapters of gentle, simple adventures. Read full book review >
THE FLYING BEAVER BROTHERS AND THE MUD-SLINGING MOLES by Maxwell Eaton III
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 9, 2013

"The story is so engaging that when they finish the book, readers may be ready to draw their own Flying Beaver Brothers adventure, complete with sound effects. (Graphic novel. 6-9)"
Eaton has learned an important truth: One of the great joys of reading comic books is the sound effects. Read full book review >
THE FLYING BEAVER BROTHERS: BIRDS VS. BUNNIES by Maxwell Eaton III
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 9, 2013

"The Flying Beaver Brothers may not look imposing, but they can meet any challenge they take on, even armies of birds and bunnies. By the end of the book, readers will believe a beaver can fly—and that they also have secondary ocular membranes. (Graphic novel. 6-10)"
Birds vs. bunnies: It was only a matter of time. Read full book review >
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 10, 2012

"Some readers won't make it through the most painful jokes, but those who do will see something marvelous building itself in front of their eyes. (Graphic novel. 6-9)"
Who says penguins are cute? Read full book review >
TWO DUMB DUCKS by Maxwell Eaton III
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 12, 2010

Despite a mild cover featuring simple rubber-ducky types, you'd be a dumb duck to assume a toddler audience for this sly humor. Using bright, flat colors and generic two-dimensional shapes, Eaton draws Steve and Carl, distressed by seagulls who taunt, "Two dumb ducks! Two dumb ducks!" The ducks plot (non-specific) revenge but fall asleep in the mud; when they waken, it's the seagulls' turn to hide—because they mistake the mud-covered ducks for "MUCK MONSTERS!" Problem solved—but who's the audience? Dick & Jane diction ("Steve and Carl are ducks… / Steve likes cans… / Carl likes socks… // They do not like seagulls") and an attempt to halt the jeering with an earnest request speak to toddlers, but psychologizing (might the bullies have "Troubles at home?") and puppets with x-eyes (evoking comic-book death) are funny for older kids or teens. While rooting for its heroes, the text also winks at readers: The ducks shouldn't be teased, but they are kind of dumb. Use this one for casual fun, not for relating to bullied protagonists. (Picture book. 5-8)Read full book review >