AND STILL I RISE by Maya Angelou

AND STILL I RISE

KIRKUS REVIEW

In her third volume of poems, Maya Angelou proves once again that audacity can pay off. Seemingly unafraid to approach anything, she includes comments on aging, the disappointments of love, anger at the abuse of black people, and the everyday aspects of womanhood. The moving spirit is summed up in the poem "Still I Rise" when she says "Does my sassiness upset you?/ Why are you beset with gloom?/ 'Cause I walk like I've got oil wells/ Pumping in my living room. . . ." The music of these lines is continued throughout the book: indeed Angelou's use of the refrain often serves to break up a poem when the tension grows overwhelming, as in "One More Round," an anti-slavery piece, where she punctuates illustrations of abuse with a chorus reminiscent of a work song: "One more round/ And let's heave it down. . . ." Angelou's most glaring weakness is a tendency towards obvious and rhetorical statement, as in "Ain't that Bad," which lists items commonly associated with blacks (Stevie Wonder, rice and beans, etc.) in a way that fails to dramatize any point. However, through her use of music and direct, uninhibited statement, she has written a distinctive and energetic volume.
Pub Date: Oct. 2nd, 1978
ISBN: 0394502523
Page count: 72pp
Publisher: Random House
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1st, 1978




MORE BY MAYA ANGELOU

NonfictionMOM & ME & MOM by Maya Angelou
by Maya Angelou
NonfictionLETTER TO MY DAUGHTER by Maya Angelou
by Maya Angelou
NonfictionA SONG FLUNG UP TO HEAVEN by Maya Angelou
by Maya Angelou

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