THE LONG GOODBYE by Meghan O'Rourke
Kirkus Star

THE LONG GOODBYE

A Memoir

KIRKUS REVIEW

Poet and Slate culture critic O’Rourke (Halflife: Poems, 2007) offers a staggeringly intimate account of a pristine life interrupted by the ravages of her mother's cancer.

Much like Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking (2005) and Sarah Manguso's The Two Kinds of Decay (2008), O'Rourke makes fine use of a strong voice and hyperawareness to recount a terribly painful tale. The author spares the reader no detail, revealing the deconstruction of a human being in the simplest terms imaginable. “I was stunned by the way my mother's body was being taken to pieces,” she writes, “how each new week brought a new failure, how surreal the disintegration of a body was.” While there is no dearth of grief memoirs, O'Rourke's candor allows her work to far transcend the imitators. She is fully conscious of the trappings of her genre, often admitting, “I know this may sound melodramatic,” and remaining wholly dedicated to combating the convenience of cliché, even acknowledging when she uses it. While the death of O’Rourke’s mother takes place midway through the book, her presence lingers. The author provides many seemingly insignificant details that provide a much-needed humanizing effect, sparing the victim from functioning as little more than a stand-in for her illness. Equally successful is O’Rourke’s ability to navigate beyond the realm of sentimentality, much preferring to render the drama with firm-lipped frankness.

An unflinching, cathartic memoir.

Pub Date: April 14th, 2011
ISBN: 978-1-59448-798-9
Page count: 320pp
Publisher: Riverhead
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15th, 2011




SIMILAR BOOKS SUGGESTED BY OUR CRITICS:

NonfictionMOST OF ME by Robyn Michele Levy
by
NonfictionBLUE NIGHTS by Joan Didion
by Joan Didion