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THE KING OF CORSICA

There’s undoubtedly a great swashbuckling adventure story here, but Kleeberg has failed to unearth it.

This first U.S. publication of the German author is a leaden historical, based on a true story, about the (mostly) charmed life of an 18th-century German baron.

After a confusing start, the fog lifts to reveal a widow and her two children living in poverty in Lorraine, in northern France. The father, a nobleman from Westphalia, has died of consumption. In 1704 the family gains a benefactor, the Count de Mortagne, a courtier at Versailles, who secures a position as a page for the young Theodor von Neuhoff; he is the first of Theodor’s many patrons. The baron is quick to learn the way the court works, and the importance of gossip; his eavesdropping skills land him an assignment in Paris, where he loses his virginity and incurs huge gambling debts (he will be a lifelong spendthrift). From Paris the court sends him to the Hague as a secret agent to contact a high-ranking Swede, in league with the French against the English. Theodor is right at home in this world of complex rivalries, but Kleeberg is a poor guide for 18th-century Europe, a hodgepodge of nation-states, city-states, grand duchies and protectorates, and Theodor is a disappointing protagonist. Not substantial enough to be a hero or anti-hero, he is the consummate dilettante as he shifts allegiance from Sweden to Spain to the House of Habsburg. In the novel’s final third he finds himself in the thick of the struggle between Corsica and the Republic of Genoa, and offers himself to the Corsicans as their King. This brings him fame throughout Europe, but on the eve of his coronation he is still subject to mood swings (“I don’t want to do this anymore”). He eventually resumes his odyssey, and any drama drains out of the narrative in Kleeberg’s recitation of dates and places.

There’s undoubtedly a great swashbuckling adventure story here, but Kleeberg has failed to unearth it.

Pub Date: May 6, 2008

ISBN: 978-1-59051-256-2

Page Count: 392

Publisher: Other Press

Review Posted Online: May 19, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2008

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A LITTLE LIFE

The phrase “tour de force” could have been invented for this audacious novel.

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Four men who meet as college roommates move to New York and spend the next three decades gaining renown in their professions—as an architect, painter, actor and lawyer—and struggling with demons in their intertwined personal lives.

Yanagihara (The People in the Trees, 2013) takes the still-bold leap of writing about characters who don’t share her background; in addition to being male, JB is African-American, Malcolm has a black father and white mother, Willem is white, and “Jude’s race was undetermined”—deserted at birth, he was raised in a monastery and had an unspeakably traumatic childhood that’s revealed slowly over the course of the book. Two of them are gay, one straight and one bisexual. There isn’t a single significant female character, and for a long novel, there isn’t much plot. There aren’t even many markers of what’s happening in the outside world; Jude moves to a loft in SoHo as a young man, but we don’t see the neighborhood change from gritty artists’ enclave to glitzy tourist destination. What we get instead is an intensely interior look at the friends’ psyches and relationships, and it’s utterly enthralling. The four men think about work and creativity and success and failure; they cook for each other, compete with each other and jostle for each other’s affection. JB bases his entire artistic career on painting portraits of his friends, while Malcolm takes care of them by designing their apartments and houses. When Jude, as an adult, is adopted by his favorite Harvard law professor, his friends join him for Thanksgiving in Cambridge every year. And when Willem becomes a movie star, they all bask in his glow. Eventually, the tone darkens and the story narrows to focus on Jude as the pain of his past cuts deep into his carefully constructed life.  

The phrase “tour de force” could have been invented for this audacious novel.

Pub Date: March 10, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-385-53925-8

Page Count: 720

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: Dec. 21, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2015

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WE WERE THE LUCKY ONES

Too beholden to sentimentality and cliché, this novel fails to establish a uniquely realized perspective.

Hunter’s debut novel tracks the experiences of her family members during the Holocaust.

Sol and Nechuma Kurc, wealthy, cultured Jews in Radom, Poland, are successful shop owners; they and their grown children live a comfortable lifestyle. But that lifestyle is no protection against the onslaught of the Holocaust, which eventually scatters the members of the Kurc family among several continents. Genek, the oldest son, is exiled with his wife to a Siberian gulag. Halina, youngest of all the children, works to protect her family alongside her resistance-fighter husband. Addy, middle child, a composer and engineer before the war breaks out, leaves Europe on one of the last passenger ships, ending up thousands of miles away. Then, too, there are Mila and Felicia, Jakob and Bella, each with their own share of struggles—pain endured, horrors witnessed. Hunter conducted extensive research after learning that her grandfather (Addy in the book) survived the Holocaust. The research shows: her novel is thorough and precise in its details. It’s less precise in its language, however, which frequently relies on cliché. “You’ll get only one shot at this,” Halina thinks, enacting a plan to save her husband. “Don’t botch it.” Later, Genek, confronting a routine bit of paperwork, must decide whether or not to hide his Jewishness. “That form is a deal breaker,” he tells himself. “It’s life and death.” And: “They are low, it seems, on good fortune. And something tells him they’ll need it.” Worse than these stale phrases, though, are the moments when Hunter’s writing is entirely inadequate for the subject matter at hand. Genek, describing the gulag, calls the nearest town “a total shitscape.” This is a low point for Hunter’s writing; elsewhere in the novel, it’s stronger. Still, the characters remain flat and unknowable, while the novel itself is predictable. At this point, more than half a century’s worth of fiction and film has been inspired by the Holocaust—a weighty and imposing tradition. Hunter, it seems, hasn’t been able to break free from her dependence on it.

Too beholden to sentimentality and cliché, this novel fails to establish a uniquely realized perspective.

Pub Date: Feb. 14, 2017

ISBN: 978-0-399-56308-9

Page Count: 416

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: Nov. 21, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2016

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