SEBASTIAN DARKE

PRINCE OF PIRATES

In this rousing sequel to Sebastian Darke: Prince of Fools (2008), “elfling” Sebastian abandons a disastrous career as a court jester and takes to the high seas in search of pirate treasure with Max, his witty talking buffalope, and Cornelius, his pint-sized warrior pal. En route to the port of Ramalat to hire a ship, the treasure hunters fall prey to a shape-shifting enchantress who bewitches Sebastian and obsessively stalks him throughout his quest. After engaging the fetching Captain Jenna Swift and her ship, the Sea Witch, the companions sail through dangerous waters infested with carnivorous keifers, battle unsavory pirates and narrowly escape giant lizards as they follow a cryptic map to Captain Callinestra’s hidden booty. Caveney successfully balances a fast-paced, action-packed plot with unabashed humor, a suggestion of romance and three unlikely heroes, whose foibles make them convincing as well as endearing. Sebastian remains naively irresistible and Cornelius fearlessly valorous while self-centered Max steals the show with his plaintive whining and droll wisecracks. Swashbuckling fare for fans of this original adventure series. (Fantasy. 12-17)

Pub Date: April 14, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-385-73468-4

Page Count: 256

Publisher: Delacorte

Review Posted Online: June 24, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2009

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Wrought with admirable skill—the emptiness and menace underlying this Utopia emerge step by inexorable step: a richly...

THE GIVER

From the Giver Quartet series , Vol. 1

In a radical departure from her realistic fiction and comic chronicles of Anastasia, Lowry creates a chilling, tightly controlled future society where all controversy, pain, and choice have been expunged, each childhood year has its privileges and responsibilities, and family members are selected for compatibility.

As Jonas approaches the "Ceremony of Twelve," he wonders what his adult "Assignment" will be. Father, a "Nurturer," cares for "newchildren"; Mother works in the "Department of Justice"; but Jonas's admitted talents suggest no particular calling. In the event, he is named "Receiver," to replace an Elder with a unique function: holding the community's memories—painful, troubling, or prone to lead (like love) to disorder; the Elder ("The Giver") now begins to transfer these memories to Jonas. The process is deeply disturbing; for the first time, Jonas learns about ordinary things like color, the sun, snow, and mountains, as well as love, war, and death: the ceremony known as "release" is revealed to be murder. Horrified, Jonas plots escape to "Elsewhere," a step he believes will return the memories to all the people, but his timing is upset by a decision to release a newchild he has come to love. Ill-equipped, Jonas sets out with the baby on a desperate journey whose enigmatic conclusion resonates with allegory: Jonas may be a Christ figure, but the contrasts here with Christian symbols are also intriguing.

Wrought with admirable skill—the emptiness and menace underlying this Utopia emerge step by inexorable step: a richly provocative novel. (Fiction. 12-16)

Pub Date: April 1, 1993

ISBN: 978-0-395-64566-6

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1993

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THE BOY IN THE STRIPED PAJAMAS

After Hitler appoints Bruno’s father commandant of Auschwitz, Bruno (nine) is unhappy with his new surroundings compared to the luxury of his home in Berlin. The literal-minded Bruno, with amazingly little political and social awareness, never gains comprehension of the prisoners (all in “striped pajamas”) or the malignant nature of the death camp. He overcomes loneliness and isolation only when he discovers another boy, Shmuel, on the other side of the camp’s fence. For months, the two meet, becoming secret best friends even though they can never play together. Although Bruno’s family corrects him, he childishly calls the camp “Out-With” and the Fuhrer “Fury.” As a literary device, it could be said to be credibly rooted in Bruno’s consistent, guileless characterization, though it’s difficult to believe in reality. The tragic story’s point of view is unique: the corrosive effect of brutality on Nazi family life as seen through the eyes of a naïf. Some will believe that the fable form, in which the illogical may serve the objective of moral instruction, succeeds in Boyle’s narrative; others will believe it was the wrong choice. Certain to provoke controversy and difficult to see as a book for children, who could easily miss the painful point. (Fiction. 12-14)

Pub Date: Sept. 12, 2006

ISBN: 0-385-75106-0

Page Count: 224

Publisher: David Fickling/Random

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 2006

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