An invitation for teens and tweens to share in a popular movement.

LIVING SIMPLY

A TEEN GUIDE TO MINIMALISM

This short, accessible guide offers a quick introduction to minimalism.

Covering the history of minimalist movements, the environmental and human impacts of excess consumption, advice for ways to start living more simply, and basic guidelines for purchases and discards, the author demonstrates a connection between the current vogue for minimalism in the developed world and 20th-century minimalism in music, writing, and art. While her actual advice could easily (and more minimally) be presented in a magazine article, the variety of her approaches allows for repetition in ways that might make the content sink in without becoming boring (at least for those who haven’t encountered these ideas before). The attractive, colorful presentation—large legible type, frequent subheadings, photographs, and mini-essays that offer breaks in the narrative flow—will encourage readers to embrace the content. Mostly young people, of varying races and nationalities, are shown in the images. Unfortunately there is a disconnect between the descriptions of the negative personal toll of consumerism in the developed world and the paternalistic portrayals of eco-friendly ways of life in developing nations. Sadly, the text and backmatter offer no citations for the statistics. As is often the case, when suggestions for re-use involve crafts, the product is likely to produce more waste. But overall, this common-sense guide will be useful.

An invitation for teens and tweens to share in a popular movement. (source notes, glossary, selected bibliography, further information, index) (Nonfiction. 12-16)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5415-0054-9

Page Count: 116

Publisher: Twenty-First Century/Lerner

Review Posted Online: Oct. 23, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15, 2018

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An engaging, admiring, and insightful portrait of an uncompromising, civic-minded, visionary artist.

MAYA LIN

THINKING WITH HER HANDS

One of the world’s most celebrated creators of civic architecture is profiled in this accessible, engaging biography.

Similar in style and format to her Everybody Paints!: The Lives and Art of the Wyeth Family (2014) and Wideness and Wonder: The Life and Art of Georgia O’Keeffe (2011), Rubin’s well-researched profile examines the career, creative processes, and career milestones of Maya Lin. Rubin discusses at length Lin’s most famous achievement, designing the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Chinese-American Lin was a reserved college student who entered and won the competition to design and build the memorial. Her youth and ethnicity were subjects of great controversy, and Rubin discusses how Lin fought to ensure her vision of the memorial remained intact. Other notable works by Lin, including the Civil Rights Memorial for the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama, a library and chapel for the Children’s Defense Fund, the Museum of Chinese in America, and the outdoor Wave Field project are examined but not in as much depth as the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Attractively designed, the book is illustrated extensively with color photos and drawings.

An engaging, admiring, and insightful portrait of an uncompromising, civic-minded, visionary artist. (bibliography, source notes, index) (Biography. 12-15)

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4521-0837-7

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Chronicle Books

Review Posted Online: Aug. 21, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2017

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Though there are plenty of issues worthy of attention not addressed here, this lively effort serves well as a revealing,...

EYES & SPIES

HOW YOU'RE TRACKED AND WHY YOU SHOULD KNOW

From the Visual Exploration series

The word “Orwellian” is oddly absent in this chilling look at how we now live in a world of near-constant surveillance and data collection.

Kyi examines how information and data about almost everyone are collected and used by individuals, government agencies, companies, and other organizations. She poses three questions to readers: who’s watching, and why? Where is the line between public and private? How can you keep your secrets to yourself? These questions are addressed in chapters exploring such subjects as computer surveillance, cyberbullying, data mining, and personal privacy. There is discussion of such surveillance technologies as drones, GPS, and RFID tags. Although there is little here that does not seem creepy, “Creepy Line” sidebars in each chapter highlight controversial real-life scenarios and ask readers where they would set their own boundaries. That label refers to a statement from former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, who said the company’s policy was “to get right up to the creepy line and not cross it.” There are also ongoing arguments posed for both increased security and increased privacy, encouraging readers to think critically about the issues.

Though there are plenty of issues worthy of attention not addressed here, this lively effort serves well as a revealing, thoughtful, and provocative introduction to a complex subject and alarming realities. (further reading, source notes, index) (Nonfiction. 12-16)

Pub Date: March 14, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-55451-911-8

Page Count: 140

Publisher: Annick Press

Review Posted Online: Dec. 26, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2017

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